Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Please check the below code,

import sys
try:
    seq=eval(raw_input("Enter seq number: "))
    if seq <= 0 or seq >= 9999:
       print "Sequence number not in range [0001-9999]"
       sys.exit(1)
except:
      print "!!! Sequence number not in range [0001-9999]"
      sys.exit(1)

I gave a string to eval raw_input function.

$> python test.py
Enter seq number: "12"


Sequence number not in range [0001-9999]
!!! Sequence number not in range [0001-9999]

Why is it not exiting even after receiving exit call?

share|improve this question
5  
use int instead of eval. Use except ValueError: instead of bare except: –  J.F. Sebastian Jan 28 '13 at 18:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

sys.exit just raises an exception (SystemExit), which is then caught. As a demonstration:

import sys
import traceback

try:
    sys.exit(1)
except:
    print "This threw the following exception:"
    traceback.print_exc()
# This threw the following exception:
# Traceback (most recent call last):
#   File "test.py", line 5, in <module>
#     sys.exit(1)
# SystemExit: 1
share|improve this answer
    
thanks david, how can i overcome this ? –  Dinesh Jan 28 '13 at 18:21
    
@Dinesh: Be specific in your except: about what exception you are trying to catch. What are you trying to avoid? An IndexError? A ValueError? –  David Robinson Jan 28 '13 at 18:22
    
You could also use os._exit to kill the interpretter right then and there -- but it's definitely not recommended :) –  mgilson Jan 28 '13 at 18:24
    
got it.. thanks david. –  Dinesh Jan 28 '13 at 18:24
    
Just say "except Exception:" - bare "except:" clauses are problematic for just this reason. And the SystemExit exception that is thrown by sys.exit will not be caught by "except Exception:", so there is no extra excepting needed. –  Paul McGuire Feb 4 '13 at 14:43

sys.exit raises the SystemExit exception which is caught by your unnamed exception handler

Note, it is usually not a good idea to have a generic exception handler as its evident here.

So as to avoid catching the SystemExit with your generic exception handler, add another exception handler to handler your SystemExit

>>> try:
    seq=eval(raw_input("Enter seq number: "))
    if seq <= 0 or seq >= 9999:
       print "Sequence number not in range [0001-9999]"
       sys.exit(1)
except SystemExit:
    pass
except Exception:
      print "!!! Sequence number not in range [0001-9999]"
      sys.exit(1)
share|improve this answer
1  
No! This is not correct! By adding "except Exception", you are already doing the right thing. SystemExit and KeyboardInterrupt (to name two special exceptions) do not derive from Exception, so you do not need the additional do-nothing "except SystemExit:" handler. The OP's original problem was the bare "except:" handler, which catches everything, including SystemExit. Changing to "except Exception:" is the actual solution. –  Paul McGuire Jan 28 '13 at 19:21

This is an excellent case why you should never use a bare except. Invalid numbers are ValueErrors, so:

import sys
try:
    seq = int(raw_input("Enter seq number: "))
    if seq <= 0 or seq >= 9999:
       raise ValueError('sequence number not in range [0001-9999]')
except ValueError as e:
    print e
    sys.exit(1)

Output:

C:\>test
Enter seq number: 10000
sequence number not in range [0001-9999]

C:\>test
Enter seq number: abc
invalid literal for int() with base 10: 'abc'

C:\>test
Enter seq number: 5

Note eval is also frowned upon, because it will execute whatever the user types, such as import shutil; shutil.rmtree('/').

share|improve this answer
    
.rmtree('\\') or .rmtree('/') –  J.F. Sebastian Jan 29 '13 at 20:27

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.