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I have a text file like this:

Apple
Orange
Orange
Banana
Banana
Orange
Banana
Orange
Apple
Orange

I want to produce the following output after running a bash shell script:

Apple: 2
Orange: 5
Banana: 3

It's pretty standard stuff if I use a full blown language like Java/C++ etc but what is the quickest way to do it with a shell script/command line?

share|improve this question
    
homework, eh? –  Dennis Williamson Sep 21 '09 at 22:06
    
@Dennis: Or combining a ton of internet fiction (with author location information) with a list of fruits to do a study on fruit prevalence vs. region! Aren't you curious? –  Jefromi Sep 22 '09 at 0:44

4 Answers 4

up vote 12 down vote accepted
sort $FILE | uniq -c

will give you

2 Apple
3 Banana
5 Orange
share|improve this answer
1  
and to reformat, you can use perl as NawaMan said, or sed: ... | sed -r 's/ *([0-9])+ *(.*)/\2: \1/' (the -r switches it to extended regex, and the substitution is the same as NawaMan's without the unnecessary brackets). –  Jefromi Sep 21 '09 at 21:22
    
agree with this as best, because it's likey that the user is flexible on output format. Requirements are often agreed upon after a dialog has started. –  ericslaw Sep 21 '09 at 22:35

This solution uses only one tool: awk

$ awk '{count[$0]++} END {for (c in count) {print c ": " count[c]}} ' count.txt
Orange: 5
Banana: 3
Apple: 2
share|improve this answer

sort filename | uniq -c | awk '{ print $2 ": " $1 }'

share|improve this answer
    
No need to cat! –  Jefromi Sep 21 '09 at 21:09
    
agreed, no need to cat –  rangalo Sep 21 '09 at 21:10
    
The additional awk will format it as required –  rangalo Sep 21 '09 at 21:25
1  
I am super-sorry about the -1 I apparently gave you - just a misclick; I immediately tried to fix it and it tells me it's too old. –  Jefromi Sep 21 '09 at 21:33
    
no probs, I gave you +1 for the correction you suggested –  rangalo Sep 21 '09 at 21:35
uniq -c $FILE | perl -pe 's|[ ]*([0-9]+)[ ]*(.*)|\2: \1|'

This will format it to the way to specified. You can add '| sort' at the end the sort it too.

EDIT: As points out in the comment, I make a mistake about uniq so here is the corrected one.

sort $FILE | uniq -c | perl -pe 's|[ ]*([0-9]+)[ ]*(.*)|\2: \1|'

Sorry for the problem.

share|improve this answer
    
uniq checks for consecutive identical lines. You must sort the list first. –  Jefromi Sep 21 '09 at 21:18
    
Thanks for pointing that out. I mostly used to already sorted data so I forgot about that. –  NawaMan Sep 21 '09 at 21:23

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