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I would like to specify a regression in R that would estimate coefficients on x that are conditional on a third variable, z, being greater than 0. For example

y ~ a + x*1(z>0) + x*1(z<=0)

What is the correct way to do this in R using formulas?

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@liuminzhao: I don't think this answers the question. Setting z up as a factor wouldn't allow you to do this kind of conditional regression. –  David Robinson Jan 28 '13 at 19:29
    
@DavidRobinson Thanks, I misunderstood op's question. Maybe create 2 new covariates, like x1 = x*I(z>0) and x2 = x*I(z<=0) ? –  liuminzhao Jan 28 '13 at 19:35
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2 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The ":" (colon) operator is used to construct conditional interactions (when used with disjoint predictors constructed with I). Should be used with predict

> y=rnorm(10)
> x=rnorm(10)
> z=rnorm(10)
> mod <- lm(y ~ x:I(z>0) )
> mod

Call:
lm(formula = y ~ x:I(z > 0))

Coefficients:
    (Intercept)  x:I(z > 0)FALSE   x:I(z > 0)TRUE  
      -0.009983        -0.203004        -0.655941  

> predict(mod, newdata=data.frame(x=1:10, z=c(-1, 1)) )
         1          2          3          4          5          6          7 
-0.2129879 -1.3218653 -0.6189968 -2.6337471 -1.0250057 -3.9456289 -1.4310147 
         8          9         10 
-5.2575108 -1.8370236 -6.5693926 
> plot(1:10, predict(mod, newdata=data.frame(x=1:10, z=c(-1)) )  )
> lines(1:10, predict(mod, newdata=data.frame(x=1:10, z=c(1)) ) )

Might help to look at its model matrix:

> model.matrix(mod)
   (Intercept) x:I(z > 0)FALSE x:I(z > 0)TRUE
1            1      -0.2866252     0.00000000
2            1       0.0000000    -0.03197743
3            1      -0.7427334     0.00000000
4            1       2.0852202     0.00000000
5            1       0.8548904     0.00000000
6            1       0.0000000     1.00044600
7            1       0.0000000    -1.18411791
8            1       0.0000000    -1.54110256
9            1       0.0000000    -0.21173300
10           1       0.0000000     0.17035257
attr(,"assign")
[1] 0 1 1
attr(,"contrasts")
attr(,"contrasts")$`I(z > 0)`
[1] "contr.treatment"
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+1! elegant..R formula are in my TODO list .. –  agstudy Jan 28 '13 at 20:22
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  y <- c(4.17,5.58,5.18,6.11,4.50,4.61,5.17,4.53,5.33,5.14)
  z <- sample(x=-10:10,size=length(trt),replace=T)
  x <- c(4.81,4.17,4.41,3.59,5.87,3.83,6.03,4.89,4.32,4.69)
  a <- rnorm(n=length(x))
  lm(y~a+I(x*1*I(z>0))+ I(x*1*I(z<=0)))

But I think using the : operator in DWIN solution is more elegant..

Edit

lm(y~a+I(x*1*I(z>0))+ I(x*1*I(z<=0)))

Call:

lm(formula = y ~ a + I(x * 1 * I(z > 0)) + I(x * 1 * I(z <= 0)))

Coefficients:
         (Intercept)                     a   I(x * 1 * I(z > 0))  I(x * 1 * I(z <= 0))  
              6.5775               -0.1345               -0.3352               -0.3366  

> lm(formula = y ~ a+ x:I(z > 0))

Call:
lm(formula = y ~ a + x:I(z > 0))

Coefficients:
    (Intercept)                a  x:I(z > 0)FALSE   x:I(z > 0)TRUE  
         6.5775          -0.1345          -0.3366          -0.3352  
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I think y ~ x*I(z>0) might give what your construction produced, but I don't think it is what the OP was expecting. It gives an extra intercept term. –  BondedDust Jan 28 '13 at 20:30
    
@DWin Right. I can simplify it to lm(y~a+I(x*I(z>0))+ I(x*I(z<=0))) but When I compare my solution with it gives the same result. –  agstudy Jan 28 '13 at 20:35
    
Both give an extraneous term but they are different coefficients. I'm not clear that either one can be called correct, Correctness would depend on predictions, but ease of understanding depends on whether the coefficients have a natural interpretation as slopes. –  BondedDust Jan 28 '13 at 20:46
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