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I am using Oracle Database 11g Enterprise Edition Release 11.2.0.2.0

I have a table as follows:

Table1:
Name              Null     Type          
----------------- -------- ------------- 
NAME              NOT NULL VARCHAR2(64)  
VERSION           NOT NULL VARCHAR2(64) 


Table1
Name    Version
---------------
A         1
B         12.1.0.2
B         8.2.1.2
B         12.0.0
C         11.1.2
C         11.01.05

I want the output as:

Name    Version
---------------
A        1
B        12.1.0.2
C        11.01.05

Basically, I want to get the row for each name which have highest version. For this I am using the following query:

SELECT t1.NAME, 
       t1.VERSION
FROM TABLE1 t1 
LEFT OUTER JOIN TABLE1 t2
on (t1.NAME = t2.NAME and t1.VERSION < t2.VERSION)
where t2.NAME is null

Now 't1.VERSION < t2.VERSION' only works in normal version cases but in cases such as:

B         12.1.0.2
B         8.2.1.2

It fails, I need a PL/SQL script to normalize the version strings and compare them for higher value.

share|improve this question
    
This solution is SQL Server-specific, but it may give you some ideas: stackoverflow.com/questions/3057532/… –  LittleBobbyTables Jan 28 '13 at 19:40
    
@LittleBobbyTables Even there Version number is assumed to have (Major, Minor, Release) numbers only. –  SparKot ॐ Jan 28 '13 at 20:16

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Just wrote a MySQL user defined function to accomplish the task, you can easily port it to ORACLE PL/SQL.

DELIMITER $$

DROP FUNCTION IF EXISTS `VerCmp`$$

CREATE FUNCTION VerCmp (VerX VARCHAR(64), VerY VARCHAR(64), Delim CHAR(1))
RETURNS INT DETERMINISTIC
BEGIN
    DECLARE idx INT UNSIGNED DEFAULT 1;
    DECLARE xVer INT DEFAULT 0;
    DECLARE yVer INT DEFAULT 0;
    DECLARE xCount INT UNSIGNED DEFAULT 0;
    DECLARE yCount INT UNSIGNED DEFAULT 0;
    DECLARE counter INT UNSIGNED DEFAULT 0;

SET xCount = LENGTH(VerX) - LENGTH(REPLACE(VerX, Delim,'')) +1;
SET yCount = LENGTH(VerY) - LENGTH(REPLACE(VerY, Delim,'')) +1;

IF xCount > yCount THEN
    SET counter = xCount;
ELSE
    SET counter = yCount;
END IF;

WHILE (idx <= counter) DO

    IF (xCount >= idx) THEN
        SET xVer = SUBSTRING_INDEX(SUBSTRING_INDEX(VerX, Delim, idx), Delim, -1) +0;
    ELSE
        SET xVer =0;
    END IF;
    IF (yCount >= idx) THEN
        SET yVer = SUBSTRING_INDEX(SUBSTRING_INDEX(VerY, Delim, idx), Delim, -1) +0;
    ELSE 
        SET yVer = 0;
    END IF;

    IF (xVer > yVer) THEN
        RETURN 1;
    ELSEIF (xVer < yVer) THEN
        RETURN -1;
    END IF;

    SET idx = idx +1;
END WHILE;

RETURN 0;

END$$;

DELIMITER ;

Few test that I ran:

select vercmp('5.2.4','5.2.5','.');
+------------------------------+
| vercmp('5.2.4','5.2.5','.')  |
+------------------------------+
|                           -1 |
+------------------------------+

select vercmp('5.2.4','5.2.4','.');
+------------------------------+
| vercmp('5.2.4','5.2.4','.')  |
+------------------------------+
|                            0 |
+------------------------------+

select vercmp('5.2.4','5.2','.');
+----------------------------+
| vercmp('5.2.4','5.2','.')  |
+----------------------------+
|                          1 |
+----------------------------+

select vercmp('1,2,4','5,2',',');
+----------------------------+
| vercmp('1,2,4','5,2',',')  |
+----------------------------+
|                         -1 |
+----------------------------+
share|improve this answer

You can do this with judicious use of REGEXP_SUBSTR(); there's no need to use PL/SQL.

select *
  from ( select a.*
              , row_number() over ( 
                  partition by name
                      order by to_number(regexp_substr(version, '[^.]+', 1)) desc
                             , to_number(regexp_substr(version, '[^.]+', 2)) desc
                             , to_number(regexp_substr(version, '[^.]+', 3)) desc
                             , to_number(regexp_substr(version, '[^.]+', 4)) desc
                               ) as rnum
          from table1 a )
 where rnum = 1

Here's a SQL Fiddle to demonstrate. Please note how I've had to convert each portion to a number in order to get this to work.

However, I cannot emphasise enough how much easier your life would be if you separated these up into different columns, major version, minor version etc. You could then have a virtual column that concatenates them all together to ensure that your export is always standardised, should you wish.

If, for instance, you created a table as follows:

create table table1 ( 
    name varchar2(64)
  , major number
  , minor number
  , build number
  , revision number
  , version varchar2(200) generated always as (
      to_char(major) || '.' || 
      to_char(minor) || '.' || 
      to_char(build) || '.' || 
      to_char(revision)
      )

Your query becomes simpler to understand; also in SQL Fiddle

select name, version
  from ( select a.*
              , row_number() over ( 
                   partition by name
                       order by major desc
                              , minor desc
                              , build desc
                              , revision desc ) as rnum
           from table1 a )
 where rnum = 1
share|improve this answer
    
Shouldn't the third row be to_number(regexp_substr(version, '[^.]+', 3))? Otherwise, +1, that's nice and elegant, plus good emphasis. –  LittleBobbyTables Jan 28 '13 at 20:26

This solution is independent on how many numerical parts are inside version code.
It only assumes that every numerical part consists of not more than 6 digits.

select 
  name,
  max(version) keep (dense_rank first order by version_norm desc) 
    as max_version
from (
    select 
      t.*,
      regexp_replace(
        regexp_replace('000000'||version, '\.', '.000000')||'.',
        '\d*(\d{6}\.)', '\1') 
        as version_norm
    from table1 t
  )
group by name

SQL Fiddle

share|improve this answer

You somehow need to convert the string values into numeric values, and then scale them by some appropriate multiplier. Assume that each version value must be a number between 0..99 as an example. So, if your string was "8.2.1.2", you would scale the numeric values of the string, "a.b.c.d" = d + c*100 + b*10000 + a*1000000, = 2 + 100 + 20000 + 8000000 = 8020102, then you can use that value to order.

I found a function you can use to parse a token from a delimited string:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION get_token (the_list     VARCHAR2,
                                      the_index    NUMBER,
                                      delim        VARCHAR2 := ',')
   RETURN VARCHAR2
IS
   start_pos   NUMBER;
   end_pos     NUMBER;
BEGIN
   IF the_index = 1
   THEN
      start_pos := 1;
   ELSE
      start_pos :=
         INSTR (the_list,
                delim,
                1,
                the_index - 1);

      IF start_pos = 0
      THEN
         RETURN NULL;
      ELSE
         start_pos := start_pos + LENGTH (delim);
      END IF;
   END IF;

   end_pos :=
      INSTR (the_list,
             delim,
             start_pos,
             1);

   IF end_pos = 0
   THEN
      RETURN SUBSTR (the_list, start_pos);
   ELSE
      RETURN SUBSTR (the_list, start_pos, end_pos - start_pos);
   END IF;
END get_token;

so call something like

select to_number(get_token(version,1,'.'))*1000000 +  to_number(get_token(version,2,'.'))*10000 + .. etc.
share|improve this answer
    
Only if versioning is proper. Check out the B's case in the question B - 12.1.0.2 and B - 12.0.0. What if the second one was say B - 12.2.0 or B - 12.3? –  SparKot ॐ Jan 28 '13 at 20:06
    
Correct. I did not account for that. –  OldProgrammer Jan 28 '13 at 20:08
    
Can you modify the function to take two version number strings say VersionComp(VerX, VerY) and returns +ve for greater; -ve for lower and 0 for equal? –  SparKot ॐ Jan 28 '13 at 20:10

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