Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've seen lots of code like this:

SomeType* ptr = NULL;
ptr = SomeMethod(some, params);

What's the point? I've also seen it where ptr is declared somewhere else (for example in a class definition) and then in the class constructor there'd be this:

ptr = NULL;
ptr = SomeMethod(some, params);

I don't understand why this is done. Surely the ptr = NULL line is useless?

share|improve this question
7  
Quite right, it's useless. Best to say SomeType * ptr = SomeMethod(some, params);. –  Kerrek SB Jan 28 '13 at 19:54
3  
Completely useless. –  chris Jan 28 '13 at 19:54
1  
Some programmers have a touch of paranoia, and seem to believe that if they don't dot every i and cross every t some race condition will magically appear and blow everything up. I think it's just over-zealous defensive programming. –  Chris Jan 28 '13 at 19:55
6  
In C89, you sometimes have to declare separately from assignment, and I understand why someone doesn't want to leave things uninitialized. –  Anton Kovalenko Jan 28 '13 at 19:55
3  
@Chris In this special case you are right. The two lines should be merged. Generally this behavior has got nothing to do with paranoia. It's a manifestation of defensive programming. I'v seen too many people modifying code and suddenly using uninitialized variables. Very ugly effects arise from this. (Especially with optimization turned on) –  junix Jan 28 '13 at 20:16
show 3 more comments

6 Answers

up vote 34 down vote accepted

if "SomeMethod" throws an exception your SomeType* will keep pointing to something you don't want it to point to. Hence it is definitely a good practice to set pointer to null if you don't want it to point to the old thing anymore.

share|improve this answer
14  
This is true in C++ only. –  user529758 Jan 28 '13 at 19:57
1  
@trumpetlicks the C++ solution would be to have some kind of smart pointer that takes some sensible action when exiting the scope. –  juanchopanza Jan 28 '13 at 20:00
1  
@juanchopanza - true, but even in your example, you would still be low level wise taking a similar nullifying approach. There are hardware reasons for why you may REALLY wish to set to NULL as well. In the case of a system without ECC, exceptions can occur if a single event upset occurs and that non-initialized value is somehow glitched as the next pointer to run, etc... Many times that RAM location that the pointer is stored in comes up in a meta-value state (i.e. not zeroized). secure practices dont want to have values in no-mans-land. Fun question though :-) –  trumpetlicks Jan 28 '13 at 20:05
6  
This applies only to assignment in C++. In the case of initialization, the scope of the pointer variable will be exited and the possible uninitialized value is not an issue. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jan 28 '13 at 20:20
2  
... And in the case of assignment, you have to wonder why you discarded the old pointer before creating a new pointer. That's a bad design for exception-safe code. Instead, allocate the new pointer (on exception nothing has changed yet), then swap pointers (can't throw), then de-allocate the old object (can't throw either). As a result, you either have the old or the new state, but never a NULL'ed pointer. –  MSalters Jan 29 '13 at 8:16
show 1 more comment

Aside from the very good points of throwing exceptions, which applies to C++, even in C, it's a good idea to initialize all variables. The compiler will nearly always optimise the initialization away when it can determine it's not needed.

Here's a little example of what can happen if you don't.

SomeType* ptr;
ptr = SomeMethod(some, params);

As you can see, that works fine, no problem with ptr not having a valid value.

Now, someone decides that it's a good idea to add a bit more code:

SomeType* ptr;

int x = someotherfunction;

if (x > 90)
{
     ptr = SomeMethod(some, params);
}

Now all of a sudden your ptr will have some random nonsense content - may be NULL, but quite likely something else. Yes, we all think we will remember to check back to see if our change has affected something else, etc, etc. But if you've been programming for a few years, I'm almost certainly you've had a few cases of "Oops, didn't think about that".

Imagine that the new code where I added "someotherfunction" is 20 or 30 lines instead, and you can clearly see the problem.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for pointing out maintainability –  junix Jan 28 '13 at 20:19
2  
I thought that the comparative discussion is with the approach mentioned by Kerrek SB in the comment, "SomeType * ptr = SomeMethod(some, params);", not leaving ptr unassigned. –  Arun Jan 28 '13 at 20:50
    
@ArunSaha Now and then I find some cases where this initialization is not possible as some params need to be calculated first and C89 won't let you declare variables everywhere. Therefore you have to declare them and assign them later. We can't tell from the abstracted example of the OP what the context is. Therefore I find it important to not bluntly say it's useless because there are sometimes reasons. –  junix Jan 28 '13 at 20:57
add comment

In the first case, it is good practice to always assign a value when declaring a new value, so you do not end up with unitialised values (kind of protecting you from your own mistakes). However if it is directly after one another it can be seen as useless.

In the second case, it is completely useless.

share|improve this answer
add comment

It is useless indeed (this is called a "dead assignment"). However, some prefer to initialize pointers to NULL when declaring, then assigning to it explicitly, separately. Maybe this is just for readability reasons (perhaps some consider it more readable or find it useful to have the variable declared even when e. g. the assignment is commented out for debugging). I'm not sure I'd do it/consider this as practice.

Also note that as such, most compilers will optimize the assignment away automatically.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Not only is this practice useless; it's harmful. If you just wrote:

SomeType* ptr = NULL;
/* lots of stuff in between */
ptr = SomeMethod(some, params);

and accidentally happened to use ptr somewhere in the intervening code, the compiler would have no way of informing you about this error. If you wrote:

SomeType* ptr;
/* lots of stuff in between */
ptr = SomeMethod(some, params);

then any use of ptr before the assignment is UB, and a good compiler or static analysis tool will inform you of this error.

share|improve this answer
3  
I do not agree that uninitialized variables are better, when you have a perfectly good domain value that asserts "I do not point to anything". This "any use" business is purely academic. A good tool can also inform you that some dereferencing use of ptr prior to the assignment involves a null value. If the tool is smart enough in its data flow analysis to detect unintialized uses, it can be smart enough to know the places reached by a null pointer value. Especially a static one, obvious from an explicit initialization. –  Kaz Jan 28 '13 at 22:37
add comment

The code is useless as it stands now, but perhaps the use anticipates future maintenance in which more lines will be added between the redundant initialization and assignment such that the initialization is no longer redundant.

The code may also have been the result of a deletion. That is, perhaps some code existed between the declaration and assignment, but was since removed, and no cleanup was done to merge the assignment into the initialization. Of course, there is no point to the code being the way it is; in this situation, we just have a historical explanation about how it got that way (and perhaps justification to change it).

Sometimes seemingly useless variable initializations occur as the result of someone having had to silence a compiler warning about a "potentially unused" variable, which can happen if there is more than one way to reach the block of code where the variable is used, and the compiler isn't sophisticated enough to prove that in all cases the variable is somehow initialized by assignment.

Initializing all variables at the point where they are declared is a good habit because it reduces the potential for unpredictable behavior as a result of uninitialized data. Some argue that certain static tools work less well when uninitialized variables are obliterated with initializations that give them inappropriate values, making bugs harder to find. However, bugs are more repeatable if they are based on initialized data, and the buggy behavior quite probably also portable among platforms, too. Some languages initialize your locals for you. In Lisp, (let (x) ...) means that in the code block ..., variable x has the value NIL, since there is no initializer. Static analysis of Lisp code can easily trace facts such as that NIL is being inappropriately passed to a numeric function. In C and related languages, the issues are a bit different, because for type like int, there is no equivalent of a wrong-type value such as NIL. So 0 is substituted, which is a valid value and will not simply blow up the computations with a type mismatch. An inappropriate 0 can lead to an algorithmic bug in a calculation. In the case of pointers, however, the null pointer value is a reasonable facsimile of NIL in that it is a programmer-visible, portable domain value which says "I do not point to any object". When a pointer in fact does not point to anything for the time being, it behooves us to give it this value rather than leave random bits in it which may accidentally point to an unintended object.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.