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I have a background in coding in languages that have a concept of "classes". Now that I am coding JavaScript, I would like to code in a similar way so that each object oriented "class" I create is its own separate file.

In other languages, I would create import statements at the top of the class file to ensure other custom classes that were used within a class file so that the other custom classes were compiled into the final binary.

Of course JavaScript is not a compiled language; however, I would still like to be able to be include some kind of "import" statement at the top of custom class files so I could ensure the imported JS "class" file was available for the user's browser to download.

It would be ideal if there were a 3rd party tool that combined all of my separate class files into one JS file so the browser only had to make one HTTP request for a single JS file instead of many calls for each indicidual JS "class". Does anyone know if such a tool exists where it would do the following:

  1. allowed me to choose which JS files that I wanted to include in a single JS file
  2. crawled thru the files I selected in step 1 and found all the "import" statements at the top of each custom "class" file. These "import" statements could simply be specially formatted comments in the code that the 3rd party recognizes as import statements.
  3. The 3rd party would then create the single JS file with all of the files that were selected from step 1 and from all of the imported files that were found in step 2.

Some popular JavaScript frameworks seem to do just that. For example, jQueryUI allows you to customize the download of a single jQueryUI source file by allowing the user to check off which objects you want to use. If you uncheck an element that is needed for an item that you checked off, then the form tells you that there is a dependency you need to rectify before being able to proceed to download the file.

So is there a 3rd party tool that allows a developer to use some kind of "import" statement comment to ensure that many dependent JS files (and only the ones that the developer needs) to be combined into a single JS file?

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assuming no wonky constructs in the .js files, cat *.js > megafile.js would do. –  Marc B Jan 28 '13 at 19:59
    
Not exactly what you asked for but JS is not your typical lang, things work a bit differently... Try Grunt: gruntjs.com –  elclanrs Jan 28 '13 at 20:02
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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

RequireJS was built for exactly this purpose.

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Doesn't that trigger an HTTP request for every single required script? –  Niet the Dark Absol Jan 28 '13 at 20:03
    
Only if you have it load a module on-the-fly. –  Wayne Koorts Jan 28 '13 at 20:04
    
@WayneKoorts How do you run RequireJS so it creates a single JS file which I can then use to publish on my HTML page? Essentially, I am trying to compile my code into a single file before I publish it. thanks! –  jaxim Jan 28 '13 at 21:55
    
@jaxim: The following doc describes it quite well: svlada.com/blog/2012/07/02/require-js-optimization-part2/#t2 –  Wayne Koorts Jan 28 '13 at 22:24
    
@WayneKoorts Upon doing further research on RequireJS, I found two other utilities: Juicer and Sprockets. –  jaxim Jan 29 '13 at 1:17
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Have a look at Require.js. It lets you import various javascript files in a modularized fashion and add the required dependencies between them. Also at the end you can minify them all into one single JS file using r.js

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A trivial batch file can do this for you:

@for %i in (classes/*.js) type %i >> build.js

This works best if your JS source files are all in one folder, and this example assumes that folder is named classes. It gets a bit more complicated if you have subfolders, but a similar principle can be applied.

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I actually really like this; so simple but exactly does the job. –  Wayne Koorts Jan 28 '13 at 22:25
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Have a look at GruntJS, JQuery uses it for building. If you don't care for HTTP requests, you can use already mentioned RequireJS, which also has nice async methods to load files, which can improve perfomance in some situations.

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