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I'm trying to move a red line (stutter-free) across the screen, and I've tried all kinds of different approaches. From GDI+ double-buffering (using the BufferedGraphics class) to WPF's WriteableBitmap, and all failed. It could be that the timers im using are not accurate enough, it could v-sync tearing, but it just seems impossible. We're in the year 2013 now, and I've got a high-end GPU and still im not able to reproduce something my old 8-bit SNES had no problems with.

Does someone have a WinForms code example that is 100% smooth and flicker-free, or is it just mission impossible without DirectX?

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How fast shall it move? –  Clemens Jan 29 '13 at 8:25
    
At 32 Hz so 32 pixels per second –  Muis Jan 29 '13 at 9:03

1 Answer 1

In WPF you may simply animate a Line control.

<Canvas>
    <Line x:Name="line"
        X2="{Binding X1, RelativeSource={RelativeSource Mode=Self}}"
        Y2="{Binding ActualHeight, RelativeSource={RelativeSource Mode=FindAncestor, AncestorType=Canvas}}" Stroke="Red" StrokeThickness="4">
    </Line>
</Canvas>

You would create and start an animation with a method like this:

private void StartAnimation()
{
    var animation = new DoubleAnimation
    {
        To = ActualWidth, // width of the window
        Duration = TimeSpan.FromSeconds(ActualWidth / 32),
        RepeatBehavior = RepeatBehavior.Forever
    };

    line.BeginAnimation(Line.X1Property, animation);
}

Instead of animating the X1 property of the Line and let the X2 property follow by binding, you could also animate the RenderTransform of the Line:

<Canvas>
    <Line Y2="{Binding ActualHeight, RelativeSource={RelativeSource Mode=FindAncestor, AncestorType=Canvas}}" Stroke="Red" StrokeThickness="4">
        <Line.RenderTransform>
            <TranslateTransform x:Name="transform"/>
        </Line.RenderTransform>
    </Line>
</Canvas>

The StartAnimation method would now look like this:

private void StartAnimation()
{
    var animation = new DoubleAnimation
    {
        To = ActualWidth, // width of the window
        Duration = TimeSpan.FromSeconds(ActualWidth / 32),
        RepeatBehavior = RepeatBehavior.Forever
    };

    transform.BeginAnimation(TranslateTransform.XProperty, animation);
}
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