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With a lack of math neurons in my brain, i struggle a bit in finding my way around this.

I need to create a simple javascript function that will receive three parameters:

  • A one-dimensional, normal indexed Array with X elements (the values being unique IDs)
  • A target ID to select
  • An amount of elements to return

The third parameter would ask the function to return a set of elements, with the element having the target ID being either in the center of the result, or next to it.

The result of the function should be an array as well.

A few examples to make it a more visual explanation:

function([100,120,140,160,180,200], 120, 3)
// should return [100,120,140]

function([100,120,140,160,180,200], 160, 4)
// should return [140,160,180,200]

function([100,120,140,160,180,200], 180, 5)
// should return [140,160,180,200,100]

The case covered by the last example is what confuses me while writing the code, which i am currently attempting to, but i find myself writing strange conditions, numerous if-statements and code that generally seems like a work-around. Also the cases of parameter 3 being larger than the amount of elements in parameter 1 are a bit of an over-brainer for me.

I feel unsafe continuing with this code, because it feels buggy and simply not proper. Surely somebody with proper math skills could provide me with the theory i need to understand how to accomplish this in a more elegant fashion.

Theory or pseudo-code will suffice, but if someone has something like this ready at hand, please don't hesitate to share it.

Thank You!

(Here is what i have written so far - based on the prototype JS class implementation)

var CBasicMatrix=Class.create({

    initialize: function(elementList){
        this.elementList=elementList;
    },

    select: function(id, amount){
        if(amount>this.elementList.length) 
            amount=this.elementList.length;
        if(!this.elementList.length) return false;
        var elementIndex=this.elementList.indexOf(id);
        if(elementIndex==-1) return false;
        var isRound=amount%2==0;
        var amountHalf=isRound ? (amount/2) : (Math.ceil(amount/2)-1);
        // [464,460,462,461,463]
        var result=[];
        if(elementIndex-amountHalf >= 0) {
            var startIndex=(elementIndex-amountHalf);
            for(i=startIndex;i<=startIndex+amount;i++){
                result.push(this.elementList[i];
            }
        } else {
            // more seemingly stupid iterative code coming here 
        }

    }

});

Edit: In order to make this more understandable i will state the purpose. This code is supposed to be used for kind of a slideshow, in which multiple elements (parameter 3) are visible at the same time. Parameter 1 is the list of (the IDs of the) total elements in their correct order as they appear in the HTML declaration. Parameter 2 is the element that is currently selected and therefore should appear in the middle.

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1  
Where is your code ? – Mehdi Karamosly Jan 28 '13 at 20:29
    
Its not of any use for the sake of finding a proper solution, i think. But i'll attach what i have written so far. – SquareCat Jan 28 '13 at 20:32
    
What if you have 100 and 3? – VisioN Jan 28 '13 at 20:47
    
function([100,120,140,160,180,200], 100, 3) would return 200,100,120 – SquareCat Jan 28 '13 at 20:48
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here is my solution:

function method(arr, value, n) {
    var result = [],
        len = arr.length,
        index = arr.indexOf(value);

    for (var i = 0; index > -1 && i < n ; i++) {
        result.push(arr[(len + index - ~~(n / 2) + (n % 2 ^ 1) + i) % len]);
    }

    return result;
}

TESTS:

var arr = [100, 120, 140, 160, 180, 200];

method(arr, 120, 3);  // [100, 120, 140]
method(arr, 160, 4);  // [140, 160, 180, 200]
method(arr, 180, 5);  // [140, 160, 180, 200, 100]
method(arr, 100, 3);  // [200, 100, 120]
share|improve this answer
1  
Best answer, IMHO. It also manages overlapping (you may also add a test to support that). – Alex Filipovici Jan 28 '13 at 21:25
    
@AlexFilipovici Yes, it does work in all cases. However, my brain blasted when I've tried to make the solution easier :) And the maths probably can be shortened but at the moment I have no idea in which way. – VisioN Jan 28 '13 at 21:30
    
Basically, 1 − 2 + 3 − 4 + · · · had to be implemented, while treating the cases of crossing the array boundaries. Well done! – Alex Filipovici Jan 28 '13 at 21:41
    
Love this. That's exactly what i was looking for! – SquareCat Jan 29 '13 at 20:39
    
I believe i discovered a little leak. It first occurred when i called method([464,460,462,473],<ANY OF THE 4 IDs>,4) – it seems that the function "oversteps" one ID in that case. – SquareCat Jan 30 '13 at 14:47

I will help you by providing a pseudo code :

1 . if there is no match you should return an empty array.

2 . if there is a match you just divide the third parameter by 2, you take the result , you loop from the element found's index minus the previous result until the third parameter's value and you store the elements in a new array.

3 . you return the new array.

Update: I saw your code and I don't see any problem with it.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank You, but that is kind of where i was heading. However, in your example some cases are not covered, such as reaching the end of the array and skipping back to the beginning. Things like that. There is not a problem, logically per sé, with my code. But i believe it is immalleable and not a clean solution. I may be mistaken, but that's what it seems to me. Like a work-around. – SquareCat Jan 28 '13 at 20:43
    
my point number 1 is talking about no match (assuming all cases you talked about like reaching the end ...) I dont think that it look like a work around. – Mehdi Karamosly Jan 28 '13 at 20:46
    
I am not entirely sure if either i failed in providing a proper explanation or if you misunderstood it, but the case of reaching the end of the array would not equal having no match. It would mean to revert back to the beginning of the array. The goal is to always get the desired amount of elements out of the array provided in parameter 1. – SquareCat Jan 28 '13 at 20:48
    
I answered you based on your first question, so how do you think you can return the desired amount if you don't find a match or if the amount is bigger than the array size? – Mehdi Karamosly Jan 28 '13 at 20:49
    
Not finding a match would mean that the desired ID is not found at all. In that case returning an empty array is the only proper way to go - i agree. If the amount exceeds the array size, the proper way would be to return the maximum possible number of elements, but with the target ID being either in the center of the resulting array, or next to it. – SquareCat Jan 28 '13 at 20:51

After some careful debugging and overthinking my approach, i managed to find a solution that seems proper and safe. I am sure this could be optimised further and if anyone has any suggestions, feel free to share them.

var CBasicMatrix=Class.create({

    initialize: function(elementList){
        this.elementList=elementList;
    },

    select: function(id, amount){
        if(amount>this.elementList.length) 
            amount=this.elementList.length;
        if(!this.elementList.length) return false;
        var elementIndex=this.elementList.indexOf(id);
        if(elementIndex==-1) return false;
        var isRound=amount%2==0;
        var amountHalf=isRound ? (amount/2) : (Math.floor(amount/2));
        var result=[];
        var startIndex=(elementIndex-amountHalf);
        var endIndex=(startIndex+amount-1);
        var targetIndex=0;
        for(i=startIndex;i<=endIndex;i++){
            targetIndex=i;
            if(i>this.elementList.length-1) targetIndex=i-this.elementList.length;
            if(i<0) targetIndex=i+this.elementList.length;
            result.push(this.elementList[targetIndex]);
        }
        return result;
    }

});
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