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By way of teaching myself Moose, I'm working on a Moose object that interfaces to a particular piece of hardware. Said hardware takes a number of different commands that set various properties of the hardware, all of the form PROPERTYNAME=VALUE for a setter, and PROPERTYNAME? for a getter (note that these 'setters' and 'getters' are on the network interface to the hardware). What I want to do is create an object where all of these properties of the hardware are implemented with an attribute-like interface. Since getting and setting the various properties takes the same form for all properties, is there a way to automatically generate the setters and getters from a list of those properties?

I.E.: Rather than this:

Package MyHardware;
use Moose;
has property1 => (
    'is' => 'rw',
    'reader' => 'set_property1',
    'writer' => 'get_property1',
);

has property2 => (
    'is' => 'rw',
    'reader' => 'set_property2',
    'writer' => 'get_property2',
);

# ...

has propertyN => (
    'is' => 'rw',
    'reader' => 'set_propertyN',
    'writer' => 'get_propertyN',
);

Is there something I can do like this:

Package MyHardware;
use Moose;

attributes => (
    'is' => 'rw',
    'names' => [qw/property1 property2 ... propertyN/],
    'reader' => sub {
        my $self = shift;
        my $property = shift;
        return $self->_send_command("$property?");
    },
    'writer' => sub {
        my $self = shift;
        my $property = shift;
        my $value = shift;
        return $self->_send_command("$property=$value");
    },
);

EDIT: Here's what I want to happen:

# CALLER:
my $hw = MyHardware->new();
$hw->property1('foo');
print $hw->property2 . "\n";

And "under the hood":

$hw->property1('foo');
# Becomes 
sub { return $hw->_send_command('property1=foo'); }

# And

$hw->property2();
# Becomes
sub { return $hw->_send_command('property2?'); }
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5 Answers 5

How about looping over the properties?

use strict;
use warnings;

use Moose;

foreach my $prop ( qw( property1 property2 property3 property4 ) ) { 
    has $prop => (
        is => 'rw',
        isa => 'Str',
        reader => "get_$prop",
        writer => "set_$prop",
    );  
}

1;
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2  
Remember that has looks like syntax but it's really just an ordinary function call, executed at run-time. There is no problem using it inside a control structure or even inside another function. And there is no problem passing variable arguments to it. –  mob Jan 28 '13 at 21:35
    
That's awfully close to what I want, but (and maybe this should be a separate question) is there any way to pass arguments to the writer? Is this a situation where I should be using around()? –  Kit Peters Jan 28 '13 at 21:46
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up vote 2 down vote accepted

Figured it out. I realize that I shouldn't be using attributes at all to do this. Instead, I'll dynamically generate methods using Class::MOP::Class like so:

my $meta = Class::MOP::Class->initialize(__PACKAGE__);
foreach my $prop (qw/property1 property2 property3/) {
    $meta->add_method(qq/set_$prop/, sub { 
            my $self = shift;
            my $value = shift;
            return $self->_send_command(qq/$prop=$value/);
        }
    );
    $meta->add_method(qq/get_$prop/, sub { 
            my $self = shift;
            return $self->_send_command(qq/$prop?/);
        }
    );
}

Doing it with calls to has() would have effectively put the object state in two places - on the hardware and in the instance - and I only want it in one.

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See OP's update for clarification on desired result. (He wants an accessor, not a getter+setter.) You should stick to Moose (my $meta = __PACKAGE__->meta();) since that's what he's using. –  ikegami Jan 29 '13 at 21:34
    
oh, you're the OP. well, hmm, nevermind? –  ikegami Jan 29 '13 at 21:37
    
@ikegami I got that out of the Moose docs, actually. Seems like it's a good habit to get into. –  Kit Peters Jan 29 '13 at 21:42
    
Are you really replaying to my comment? Cause it makes no sense. Both things I suggested are more "moosy". 1) Moose code normally uses accessors instead of setters and getters. If anything, the Moose way is accessors like you asked. (But it's really personal preference, and mine is setters and getters.) 2) my $meta = __PACKAGE__->meta(); would be the Moose way. (e.g. You've probably seen __PACKAGE__->meta()->make_immutable(); a million times.) Accessing Class::MOP directly looks really really wrong, and might even be harmful in a Moose module. –  ikegami Jan 29 '13 at 21:48
    
@ikegami: per Moose::Manual::MOP: "You can also use Class::MOP::Class->initialize($name) to get a metaclass object for any class. This is safer than calling $class->meta when you're not sure that the class has a meta method." Admittedly, I know that my class, being Moose, will have a meta method, but as C::M::C->initialize() will return the existing meta if present, it seems like getting into the habit of doing it that way is good practice. –  Kit Peters Jan 29 '13 at 22:28
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You don't store any value, so you don't want attributes.

You don't don't even want two subs since you want a single name for both getting and setting.

for my $prop (qw( property1 property2 property3  )) { 
   my $accessor = sub {
      my $self = shift;
      if (@_) {
         $self->_send_command("$prop=$value");
      } else {
         return $self->_send_command("$prop?");
      }
   };

   no strict 'refs';
   *$prop = $accessor;
}
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That would be great, except I don't think you can specify a closure as a value for 'reader' or 'writer'. I try it, and I get: "bad accessor/reader/writer/predicate/clearer format, must be a HASH ref at D:/Perl64/lib/Class/MOP/Attribute.pm line 366." –  Kit Peters Jan 29 '13 at 15:37
    
@Kit Peters, oh I know why I was confused. His getter and his setter are neither. They're just plain boring ordinary subs. –  ikegami Jan 29 '13 at 19:14
    
I have replaced my answer. –  ikegami Jan 29 '13 at 19:21
    
I assume you mean "*$prop" in place of "*$prog". :) I did something like that (see my answer below) except I used Class::MOP::Class to add the accessors. –  Kit Peters Jan 29 '13 at 21:07
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I would recommend using a has rather than an individual attribute for each of your properties.

Package MyHardware;
use Moose;
has properties => (
'is' => 'rw',
'isa' => 'HashRef',
'lazy_build' => 1,
);

sub _build_properties {
    my $self = shift;
    return {
        'property1' => '',
        'property2' => '',
    };
}

print $self->properties->{property1};
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This is the easier way of doing this, I'm sure. However, I'm doing this as an exercise in figuring out how Moose works, so I'd like to see if what I want is possible. –  Kit Peters Jan 29 '13 at 15:47
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Generate getters and setters for instance data

BEGIN 
{
    my @attr = qw(prop1 prop2 prop3 prop4);
    no strict 'refs';
    for my $a (@attr)
    {
        *{__PACKAGE__ . "::get_$a"} = sub { $_[0]->{$a}         };
        *{__PACKAGE__ . "::set_$a"} = sub { $_[0]->{$a} = $_[1] };
    }
}

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No Moose required? Very nice indeed! –  Kit Peters Apr 17 '13 at 16:23
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