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I have two classes

public class Project
{
   [Key]
   public int ID { get; set; }
   public string Name { get; set; }
   public int ManagerID { get; set; }
   public int CoordID { get; set; }
   [ForeignKey("ManagerID")]
   public virtual Employee Manager { get; set; }
   [ForeignKey("CoordID")]
   public virtual Employee Coord { get; set; }

}

public class Employee
{
   [Key]
   public int EmpID { get; set; }
   public string Name { get; set; }
   [InverseProperty("ManagerID")]
   public virtual ICollection<Project> ManagerProjects { get; set; }

  [InverseProperty("CoordID")]
   public virtual ICollection<Project> CoordProjects { get; set; }
}

The ManagerID and CoordID map to the EmpID column of the Employee table. I keep getting an error for Invalid Columns becauce EF is not able to map correctly. I think it is looking for wrong column.

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1  
I think your example is wrong, public virtual Worker Manager should be Employee? –  Rogier21 Jan 28 '13 at 21:09
    
Fixed the typos. –  superartsy Jan 28 '13 at 21:16
    
Asre you looking for this? (You can use Fluent API to map when EF can't figure it out based on naming convention.) –  Brad Christie Jan 28 '13 at 21:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I think InverseProperty is used to refer to the related navigation property, not the foreign key, e.g.

public class Employee
{
   [Key]
   public int EmpID { get; set; }
   public int Name { get; set; }
   [InverseProperty("Manager")]
   public virtual ICollection<Project> ManagerProjects { get; set; }

   [InverseProperty("Coord")]
   public virtual ICollection<Project> CoordProjects { get; set; }
}

Also, is there a reason why your names are ints and not strings?

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Names are string that's a typo. –  superartsy Jan 29 '13 at 0:57
    
Thank you for suggesting the correct syntac for InverseProperty. –  superartsy Jan 29 '13 at 3:52

Best guess would be to use fluent API in your context via OnModelCreating. By renaming the column, EF can't figure out the original object to map so it's confused. However, Fluent API allows you to manually specify the map using something like the following:

public class MyContext : DbContext
{
  public DbSet<Employee> Employees { get; set; }
  public DbSet<Project> Projects { get; set; }

  protected override OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
  {
    modelBuilder.Entity<Project>()
      .HasRequired(x => x.Manager)
      .WithMany(x => x.ManagerProjects)
      .HasForeignKey(x => x.ManagerID);
    modelBuilder.Entity<Project>()
      .HasRequired(x => x.Coord)
      .WithMany(x => x.CoordProjects)
      .HasForeignKey(x => x.CoordID);
  }
}
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I wanted to know if I could do this without using Fluent API. –  superartsy Jan 29 '13 at 1:00

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