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I'm currently facing a problem, I'm writing a code, where I need to use a class inside another class. Currently, I solve the problem this way:

   class foo {
        private $bar;
        function __construct() {
            $this->bar = new different_class();
        }
    }

However, when I need to use more than 1 class, the code gets a bit long and messy. Is there some other way to do this?

My idea would be to make some sort of global class that could be called directly:

class foo{
        function hello(){
            return "Hello";
        }
    }
class bar{
        function hi(){
            return $foo->hello();
        }
    }

Is that possible? Thank you very much!

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

As others have mentioned, you have three options:

  • Use a static method, which does not require that you instantiate the class.
  • Make the second class a child class of the first.
  • Instantiate the second class within the first. (This is what you do in your first example above.)

Using the exact example you gave, a static method will work. However, a static method has real limitations - it can only be used to return constants or other static properties.

Therefore, depending on the complexity of the actual classes involved, it's very likely static may not be a viable option in many cases.

If this is the case, doing exactly what you do in your first example above is the correct option.

share|improve this answer
    
I was afraid of that answer :/ Well as I see it, my only way is combining those three options somehow to make the code cleaner. Thank you very much! – Chris Illusion Jan 28 '13 at 21:57

How about a static method, or inheritance?

static method

class foo {
   public static function hello() {
      return 'Hello';
   }
} 

class bar {
   public function hi() {
     return foo::hello();
   }
 }

inheritance

class foo {
    public function hello() {
       return 'Hello';
    } 
}

class bar extends foo {
   public function hi() {
     return $this->hello(); // Will return foo->hello()
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I can't do it through inheritance, that makes it even less readable. When calling a static method, the class constructor doesn't get executed right? Because that might be another problem. Thank you! – Chris Illusion Jan 28 '13 at 21:53

look up the static keyword.

http://www.php.net/manual/en/language.oop5.static.php

You may not need a whole static class, but that's up to your design plan.

share|improve this answer

Why not passing an instance in parameter ?

 class Foo {
    public function hello(){
       return "Hello";
    }
 } 
 class Bar{
    function hi( Foo $foo ){
       return $foo->hello();
     }
 }

Or IMHO, even better: instead of hard-coding the class, use the dependency injection. You pass in parameter an interface. All classes that implements this interface can be passed as parameter.

 interface MyInterface {
    public function hello();
 }

 class Foo implements MyInterface {
    function hello(){
       return "Hello";
    }
 } 

 class Bar{
    function hi( MyInterface $foo ){
       return $foo->hello();
     }
 }

To answer your question using an interface:

   class foo {
        private $bar;
        function __construct( AnInterface $different_class ) {
            $this->bar = different_class;
        }
    }
share|improve this answer

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