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I am trying to create a table in MySQL with two foreign keys, which reference the primary keys in 2 other tables, but I am getting an errno: 150 error and it will not create the table.

Here is the SQL for all 3 tables:

CREATE TABLE role_groups (
  `role_group_id` int(11) NOT NULL `AUTO_INCREMENT`,
  `name` varchar(20),
  `description` varchar(200),
  PRIMARY KEY (`role_group_id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB;

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `roles` (
  `role_id` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `name` varchar(50),
  `description` varchar(200),
  PRIMARY KEY (`role_id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB;

create table role_map (
  `role_map_id` int not null `auto_increment`,
  `role_id` int not null,
  `role_group_id` int not null,
  primary key(`role_map_id`),
  foreign key(`role_id`) references roles(`role_id`),
  foreign key(`role_group_id`) references role_groups(`role_group_id`)
) engine=InnoDB;

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

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1  
Could you post the error output and tell us which command (of the three) is causing the error? –  dave Sep 21 '09 at 23:08
2  
What's with the back-ticks around auto_increment? That's not valid. Auto_increment is a keyword, not an identifier. –  Bill Karwin Sep 21 '09 at 23:39

11 Answers 11

I had the same problem with ALTER TABLE ADD FOREIGN KEY.

After an hour, I found that these conditions must be satisfied to not get error 150:

  1. The two tables must be ENGINE=InnoDB. (can be others: ENGINE=MyISAM works too)
  2. The two tables must have the same charset.
  3. The PK column(s) in the parent table and the FK column(s) must be the same data type.
  4. The PK column(s) in the parent table and the FK column(s), if they have a define collation type, must have the same collation type;
  5. If there is data already in the foreign key table, the FK column value(s) must match values in the parent table PK columns.
  6. And the child table cannot be a temporary table.

Hope this helps.

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It does help, thank you. –  Timo Huovinen May 9 '12 at 9:26
3  
one more thing worth adding: if the PK of the parent table is more than one field, the order of the fields in the FK must be the same as the order in the PK –  Kip May 9 '12 at 20:44
16  
This includes things like int(11) unsigned NOT NULL vs int(11) NOT NULL. –  Glen Solsberry May 1 '13 at 20:37
2  
ALTER TABLE table_name ENGINE=InnoDB; –  TolMera Jul 24 '13 at 3:15
7  
If the table is defined ENGINE=MyISAM it doesn't generate errno 150 because it ignores foreign key declarations. It's like saying the best way to avoid trouble with your automobile engine is to drive a boat. :-) –  Bill Karwin Oct 11 '13 at 17:18

Make sure that the properties of the two fields you are trying to link with a constraint are exactly the same.

Often, the 'unsigned' property on an ID column will catch you out.

ALTER TABLE `dbname`.`tablename` CHANGE `fieldname` `fieldname` int(10) UNSIGNED NULL;
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1  
thanks it was true. –  Mahdi_Nine Mar 17 '11 at 11:46

MySQL’s generic “errno 150” message “means that a foreign key constraint was not correctly formed.” As you probably already know if you are reading this page, the generic “errno: 150” error message is really unhelpful. However:

You can get the actual error message by running SHOW ENGINE INNODB STATUS; and then looking for LATEST FOREIGN KEY ERROR in the output.

For example, this attempt to create a foreign key constraint:

CREATE TABLE t1
(id INTEGER);

CREATE TABLE t2
(t1_id INTEGER,
 CONSTRAINT FOREIGN KEY (t1_id) REFERENCES t1 (id));

fails with the error Can't create table 'test.t2' (errno: 150). That doesn’t tell anyone anything useful other than that it’s a foreign key problem. But run SHOW ENGINE INNODB STATUS; and it will say:

------------------------
LATEST FOREIGN KEY ERROR
------------------------
130811 23:36:38 Error in foreign key constraint of table test/t2:
FOREIGN KEY (t1_id) REFERENCES t1 (id)):
Cannot find an index in the referenced table where the
referenced columns appear as the first columns, or column types
in the table and the referenced table do not match for constraint.

It says that the problem is it can’t find an index. SHOW INDEX FROM t1 shows that there aren’t any indexes at all for table t1. Fix that by, say, defining a primary key on t1, and the foreign key constraint will be created successfully.

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SHOW ENGINE INNODB STATUS helped me immediately identify a problem I'd been trying to diagnose for nearly an hour. Thanks. –  jatrim Aug 29 at 0:09

What's the current state of your database when you run this script? Is it completely empty? Your SQL runs fine for me when creating a database from scratch, but errno 150 usually has to do with dropping & recreating tables that are part of a foreign key. I'm getting the feeling you're not working with a 100% fresh and new database.

If you're erroring out when "source"-ing your SQL file, you should be able to run the command "SHOW ENGINE INNODB STATUS" from the MySQL prompt immediately after the "source" command to see more detailed error info.

You may want to check out the manual entry too...from the MySQL 5.1 reference manual (http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.1/en/innodb-foreign-key-constraints.html):

"If you re-create a table that was dropped, it must have a definition that conforms to the foreign key constraints referencing it. It must have the right column names and types, and it must have indexes on the referenced keys, as stated earlier. If these are not satisfied, MySQL returns error number 1005 and refers to error 150 in the error message. If MySQL reports an error number 1005 from a CREATE TABLE statement, and the error message refers to error 150, table creation failed because a foreign key constraint was not correctly formed."

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For people who are viewing this thread with the same problem:

There are a lot of reasons for getting errors like this. For a fairly complete list of causes and solutions of foreign key errors in MySQL (including those discussed here), check out this link:

MySQL Foreign Key Errors and Errno 150

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For others that find this SO entry via Google: Be sure that you aren't trying to do a SET NULL action on a foreign key (to be) column defined as "NOT NULL." That caused great frustration until I remembered to do a CHECK ENGINE INNODB STATUS.

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Helpful tip, use SHOW WARNINGS; after trying your CREATE query and you will receive the error as well as the more detailed warning:

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
| Level   | Code | Message                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 |
+---------+------+--------------------------------------------------------------------------                          --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------                          ---------------+
| Warning |  150 | Create table 'fakeDatabase/exampleTable' with foreign key constraint failed. There is no index in the referenced table where the referenced columns appear as the first columns.
|
| Error   | 1005 | Can't create table 'exampleTable' (errno:150)                                                                                                                                                                           |
+---------+------+--------------------------------------------------------------------------                          --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------                          ---------------+

So in this case, time to re-create my table!

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Also worth checking that you aren't accidentally operating on the wrong database. This error will occur if the foreign table does not exist. Why does MySQL have to be so cryptic?

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This is usually happening when you try to source file into existing database. Drop all the tables first (or the DB itself). And then source file with SET foreign_key_checks = 0; at the beginning and SET foreign_key_checks = 1; at the end.

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Make sure that the foreign keys are not listed as unique in the parent. I had this same problem and I solved it by demarcating it as not unique.

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I've found another reason this fails... case sensitive table names.

For this table definition

CREATE TABLE user (
  userId int PRIMARY KEY AUTO_INCREMENT,
  username varchar(30) NOT NULL
) ENGINE=InnoDB;

This table definition works

CREATE TABLE product (
  id int PRIMARY KEY AUTO_INCREMENT,
  userId int,
  FOREIGN KEY fkProductUser1(userId) REFERENCES **u**ser(userId)
) ENGINE=InnoDB;

whereas this one fails

CREATE TABLE product (
  id int PRIMARY KEY AUTO_INCREMENT,
  userId int,
  FOREIGN KEY fkProductUser1(userId) REFERENCES User(userId)
) ENGINE=InnoDB;

The fact that it worked on Windows and failed on Unix took me a couple of hours to figure out. Hope that helps someone else.

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protected by Kermit Jul 10 at 23:11

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