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How would I convert:

$ find . -ls > /tmp/files.txt

Which gives me something like:

908715       40 -rwxrwxr-x    1 david            staff               16542 Nov 15 14:12 ./dump_info.py
908723        0 drwxr-xr-x    2 david            staff                  68 Nov 20 17:35 ./metadata

Into a csv output? It would look like:

908715,40,-rwxrwxr-x,1,david,staff,16542,Nov 15 14:12,./dump_info.py
908723,0,drwxr-xr-x,2,david,staff,68,Nov 20 17:35,./metadata

Here is an example title with spaces in the filename:

652640,80,-rw-rw-r--,1,david,staff,40036,Nov,6,15:32,./v_all_titles/V Catalog Report 11.5.xlsx
share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

It's a bit long to type in at the command-line, but it properly preserves spaces in the filename (and quotes it, too!)

find . -ls | python -c '
import sys
for line in sys.stdin:
    r = line.strip("\n").split(None, 10)
    fn = r.pop()
    print ",".join(r) + ",\"" + fn.replace("\"", "\"\"") + "\""
'
share|improve this answer
    
Dang, that is pretty cool (also need to replace the " in the filename at the end). – David542 Jan 29 '13 at 0:16
    
Now quotes quotes, thanks. – nneonneo Jan 29 '13 at 0:21
    
Is there a way to do multi-lined python in a bash script? Or does it all have to be in one line? – David542 Jan 29 '13 at 0:37
1  
This is a multi-lined Python script suitable for direct inclusion in a bash script (since it is delimited with '). – nneonneo Jan 29 '13 at 0:37
1  
By the way, if you want to preserve spaces in the filename, you can use print ",".join(r[:7]) + "," + " ".join(r[7:]) + ",\"" + fn.replace... in the last line. – nneonneo Jan 29 '13 at 0:40

If you don't care about the spaces in the date:

$ find . -ls | tr -s ' ' ,

If you do care about those spaces:

$ find . -ls | awk '{printf( "%s,%s,%s,%s,%s,%s,%s,%s %s %s,%s\n", $1, $2, $3, $4, $5, $6, $7, $8, $9, $10, $11 )}'

Neither of these will work if your filenames contain any whitespace. As a hack to deal with spaces in the filename, you could try:

 ... | sed 's/,/ /8g'

to get rid of all but the first 8 commas (assuming your sed supports the nonstandard 8g option as gnu sed does). Of course this won't deal with commas in the filename.

share|improve this answer
    
What if there are spaces in the filename? – David542 Jan 28 '13 at 23:55
2  
The tr solution will replace spaces in the file name with commas. The awk solution will fail to print any portion of the filename after a space. If a file name contains a newline, the output will be multi-lined. Also, if any filename contains a comma your csv will be malformed. If these issues are relevant, more work will be needed. Perhaps just pipe the output to sed and remove unwanted commas will deal with spaces in filenames... – William Pursell Jan 29 '13 at 0:02
    
@WilliamPursell with sed may not work either... his filename could be foo bar .t xt... ah!!! I mean more than one spaces, foo_ _ _ bar.tx _ _t – Kent Jan 29 '13 at 0:07

this should do the job

 find . -ls|awk 'BEGIN{OFS=","}$1=$1'
share|improve this answer
    
Please see the above question I asked -- what if there are spaces in a filename? (which there are) – David542 Jan 28 '13 at 23:56

And yet another variant. See section "-printf format" in man page of find to customize.

$ find . -type f -fprintf /tmp/files.txt "%i,%b,%M,%n,%u,%g,%s,%CY-%Cm-%Cd %CT,%p\n"

Example output:

$ less /tmp/files.txt

3414558,40,-rw-rw-r--,1,webwurst,webwurst,16542,2014-09-18 15:54:36.9232917780,./dump_info.py
3414559,8,-rw-rw-r--,1,webwurst,webwurst,68,2014-09-18 15:54:51.1752922580,./metadata
share|improve this answer

Here's a python script I drafted...

#!/opt/app/python/bin/python
# Convert ls output to clean csv    Paolo Villaflores 2015-03-16
#
# Sample usage: ls -l | ls2csv.py
#
# Features:
#   accepts -d argument to change dates to yyyy-mm-dd_hhmm format
#   input is via stdin
#   separate file/directory field
#   handle -dils type input (find -ls) versus -l
#   handle space in filename, by applying quotes around filename
#   handle date - format into something excel can handle correctly, whether it is from current year or not.
#   adds a header
#   handle symlinks - type l



import sys
from datetime import datetime

b0=True

def is_f(s):
  if s == '-':
    return 'f'
  return s

for line in sys.stdin:
    if len(line) < 40:
      continue
    if b0:
      b1=line[0] in ['-', 'd', 'c', 'l'] # c is for devices e.g. /devices/pseudo/pts@0:5, l is for symbolic link
      b0=False
      if b1:  # true when shorter ls -l style 8/9 columns. 9 for symlink
        cols=7
        print "d,perms,#links,owner,group,size,modtime,name,symlink"
      else:
        cols=9
        print "inode,bsize,d,perms,#links,owner,group,size,modtime,name,symlink"
    r = line.strip("\n").split(None, cols+1)
    if len(r) < cols+1:
      continue
    if r[cols-7][0] == 'c':
       continue  # ignore c records: devices
    fn = r.pop()
    if b1:
      c = ''
    else:
      c = ",".join(r[0:2]) + ","
    z = 0
    z = r[cols].find(':')
    if z < 0:
      d = r[cols - 1] + "/" + r[cols - 2] + "/" + r[cols]
    else:
      n = str(datetime.now()  )
      d = ''
      # handle the case where the timestamp has no year field
      tm=datetime.strptime(r[cols-2]+ " " + r[cols-1]+ " " + n[:4] +" " + r[cols], "%b %d %Y %H:%M")
      if (tm-datetime.now()).days > 0:
        d = r[cols - 1] + "/" + r[cols - 2] + "/" + str((datetime.now().year-1)) + " " + r[cols]
        tm=datetime.strptime(r[cols-2]+ " " + r[cols-1]+ " " + str(int(n[:4])-1) +" " + r[cols], "%b %d %Y %H:%M")
      else:
        d = r[cols - 1] + "/" + r[cols - 2] + "/" + " ".join([n[:4], r[cols] ] )
      if len(sys.argv) > 1 and sys.argv[1] == '-d':
        d=tm.strftime("%Y-%m-%d_%H%M")

    y = fn.find(">")
    symlink=''
    if y > 0:
       symlink = ',\"' + fn[y+2:] + '"'
       fn = fn[:y-2]
    if  fn.find( " ") <0:
      if fn.find('"') <0:
        fn2=fn
      else:
        fn2="'" + fn + "'"
    else:
      fn2="'" + fn + "'"
    print c+ is_f(r[cols-7][0]) + ",\"" + r[cols-7][1:] + "\"," + ",".join(
      r[cols-6:cols-2]) + "," + d + "," + fn2 + symlink
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