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Here is my isPalindrome method

public static boolean isPalindrome(String s){
    for(int i = 0; i < s.length()/2; i++){
        int j = s.length() - 1 - i;
        if(s.charAt(i) != s.charAt(j))
            return false;
    }
    return true;
}

my teacher says I can decrease the complexity, but I can't see how. I already am only going through half of the string. Is there any way to decrease the complexity of this solution?

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8  
Does he mean runtime complexity or the "complexity" of how your code looks aesthetically? –  sdasdadas Jan 29 '13 at 0:18
1  
Hm, this is quickly turning into "how many ways can I write a palindrome-checking function"? –  nneonneo Jan 29 '13 at 0:30
    
I think it might have been declaring the int j every time in the loop. At least that is what it seems like after I have seen these answers. –  ceptno Jan 29 '13 at 0:31
2  
@Brandon: frankly, I'd suspect that this code and all of the below answers would get optimized to the same thing after the JIT's had a chance to run. –  Louis Wasserman Jan 29 '13 at 0:34
    
It has been confirmed that modern Java implementations do in fact optimize the code so that effectively s.length() is outside the loop. I would expect the division by two to be similarly optimized. (Nevertheless, it's not a bad idea to teach people to move expensive operations outside of a loop because often they can't be optimized out.) –  David Schwartz Jan 29 '13 at 0:39

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could try something like this:

public static boolean isPalindrome (String str) {
    int left = 0;
    int right = str.length() - 1;

    while (left < right) {
        if (str.charAt(left) != str.charAt(right))
            return false;
        left++;
        right--;
    }
    return true;
}

This has the advantage of not calculating the right hand index each time through the loop, especially since it has to access the string length each time (which is constant).

As an aside, I also tend to prefer more meaningful variable names than s, i and j - my basic rule is that, if you have to resort to j at all, you're better off naming your counters more expressively (i is okay if it's the only counter).

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Depending what is meant by "complexity", one could put ++s inside the str.charAt()s, e.g. if (str.charAt(left++) != str.charAt(right--)) –  user949300 Jan 29 '13 at 0:28
    
Thanks for the style tip paxdiablo, and I think your answer is what I'm looking for. –  ceptno Jan 29 '13 at 0:32

If he means the complexity of how your code appears aesthetically, then here's a recursive solution:

public static boolean isPalindrome(String s) {
    if (s.charAt(0) != s.charAt(s.length() - 1)
       return false;
    return isPalindrome(s.substring(1, s.length() - 1);
}

If he means the complexity of the algorithm, I am not sure if you could do it any faster. Perhaps you could move substrings onto different cores (using threading) and then combine the results.

EDIT: paxdiablo suggested better code and I re-pended* it in.

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2  
euw, recursion to solve a simple problem like this? that's conceptually more complex, I think... –  nneonneo Jan 29 '13 at 0:28
    
I agree. It's an alternative, though. And it might help to understand threading the problem. –  sdasdadas Jan 29 '13 at 0:29
1  
Recursion is a nifty trick for many situations, though I'm not sure this is one of them :-) Still, it's a valid answer. Not a big fan of the testX variables, I'd tend to just have if (charat(0) != charat(len-1)) return false; return isPalindrome(blah blah);. –  paxdiablo Jan 29 '13 at 0:34
    
That's much better, thanks! –  sdasdadas Jan 29 '13 at 0:35
1  
"Re-pended"? Now you're just making stuff up :-) But leave it there, for the sake of humour. On the -1 issue, I don't think so. If the string is "pax" (len=3), you want substring(1,2) which will include starting at 1 ("a") and exclude starting at 2 ("x"), giving you "a". –  paxdiablo Jan 29 '13 at 0:47

The only thing I can think to do would be to store the length of s:

final int n = s.length();
for(int i=0; i<n/2; i++) {
    int j = n-1-i;
    if(s.charAt(i) != s.charAt(j))
        return false;
}
return true;

Aside from that, I don't see how you can make it any simpler or more efficient.

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1  
To save a few nanoseconds, you could also store n/2 and n-1 in locals, though the compiler may already be doing that for you... –  user949300 Jan 29 '13 at 0:27
    
Hence the final int as a hint to the compiler. But, such micro-optimizations are usually redundant (or even unhelpful) in the face of a good JIT. –  nneonneo Jan 29 '13 at 0:27
    
You can also remove j altogether and just shove n-1-i into charAt. But this is also the same kind of micro-optimizations that may be handled automatically by the compiler. –  Emil Lundberg Jan 29 '13 at 0:29

If you reverse the string and it still equals itself, that means it's a palindrome. Here's how I'd implement it:

package com.sandbox;

import org.apache.commons.lang.StringUtils;
import org.junit.Test;

import static junit.framework.Assert.assertFalse;
import static junit.framework.Assert.assertTrue;

public class PalindromeTest {

    @Test
    public void testTheseArePalindromes() {
        assertTrue(isPalindrome("abccba"));
        assertTrue(isPalindrome("121"));
        assertTrue(isPalindrome("Malayalam"));
        assertTrue(isPalindrome("peeweep"));
        assertTrue(isPalindrome("123 321"));
    }

    @Test
    public void testTheseAreNOTPalindromes() {
        assertFalse(isPalindrome("abc"));
        assertFalse(isPalindrome("123"));
        assertFalse(isPalindrome("123 123"));
    }

    private boolean isPalindrome(String input) {
        String lowerIn = input.toLowerCase();
        String reversed = StringUtils.reverse(lowerIn);
        return lowerIn.equals(reversed);
    }

}

The phrases on this page are also palindromes. Does it have to work on those? If it does, it's a very simple change:

package com.sandbox;

import org.apache.commons.lang.StringUtils;
import org.junit.Test;

import static junit.framework.Assert.assertFalse;
import static junit.framework.Assert.assertTrue;

public class PalindromeTest {

    @Test
    public void testTheseArePalindromes() {
        assertTrue(isPalindrome("abccba"));
        assertTrue(isPalindrome("121"));
        assertTrue(isPalindrome("Malayalam"));
        assertTrue(isPalindrome("peeweep"));
        assertTrue(isPalindrome("123 321"));
        assertTrue(isPalindrome("A dog, a plan, a canal: pagoda."));
        assertTrue(isPalindrome("A man, a plan, a canal: Panama."));
        assertTrue(isPalindrome("A tin mug for a jar of gum, Nita."));
    }

    @Test
    public void testTheseAreNOTPalindromes() {
        assertFalse(isPalindrome("abc"));
        assertFalse(isPalindrome("123"));
        assertFalse(isPalindrome("123 123"));
    }

    private boolean isPalindrome(String input) {
        String removedPunctuation = input.toLowerCase().replaceAll("[.,;: \t]", "");
        String reversed = StringUtils.reverse(removedPunctuation);
        return removedPunctuation.equals(reversed);
    }

}
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