Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Below is a 3D curve using the R function persp3d and specifying the colors.

library(rgl)

y = seq(-5,25,by=0.1)
x = seq(5,20,by=0.2)

NAs <- rep(NA, length(x)*length(y))
z <- matrix(NAs, length(x), byrow = T)
for(i in seq(1,length(x))) {
    for(j in seq(1,length(y))) {
        val = x[i] * y[j]
        z[i,j] = val
        if(z[i,j] < 0.02) {
            z[i,j] = NA
        }

    }
}

col <- rainbow(length(x))[rank(x)]

open3d()
persp3d(x,y,z,color=col,xlim=c(5,20),ylim=c(5,10),axes=T,box=F,xlab="X Axis",ylab="Y Axis",zlab="Z Axis")

And it produces this image:

enter image description here

In the current version, for an x value of 15, the color is blue regardless of the z value. But I'd like it so that high z values are dark blue whereas low z values are light blue, if that makes sense. How can I do something like this, so that color not only distinguishes x values but also z values?

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You will have to play around with colors in HSV format rather than RGB format for this. It's easier that way I think.

See my sample code below.

library(rgl)

y = seq(-5,25,by=0.1)
x = seq(5,20,by=0.2)

NAs <- rep(NA, length(x)*length(y))
z <- matrix(NAs, length(x), byrow = T)
for(i in seq(1,length(x))) {
  for(j in seq(1,length(y))) {
    val = x[i] * y[j]
    z[i,j] = val
    if(z[i,j] < 0.02) {
      z[i,j] = NA
    }

  }
}

Create unique color for each value of x.

col <- rainbow(length(x))[rank(x)]

Create grid of colors by repeating col length(y) times

col2 <- matrix(rep(col,length(y)), length(x))
for(k in 1:nrow(z)) {

  row <- z[k,]
  rowCol <- col2[k,]  
  rowRGB <- col2rgb(rowCol) #convert hex colors to RGB values
  rowHSV <- rgb2hsv(rowRGB) #convert RGB values to HSV values

  row[is.na(row)] <- 0
  v <- scale(row,center=min(row), scale=max(row)-min(row)) # scale z values to 0-1

  rowHSV['s',] <- v #update s or v values by our scaled values above
  # rowHSV['v',] <- v  # try changing either saturation or value i.e. either s or v

  newRowCol <- hsv(rowHSV['h',], rowHSV['s',], rowHSV['v', ]) #convert back to hex color codes
  col2[k,] <- newRowCol #Replace back in original color grid
}

open3d()
persp3d(x,y,z,color=col2,xlim=c(5,20),ylim=c(5,10),axes=T,box=F,xlab="X Axis",ylab="Y Axis",zlab="Z Axis")

This should give following. You can play around scaling of saturation or value of colors to get desired "lightness" or "darkness" of shades.

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
add comment

All you needed to change was one line:

library(rgl)

y = seq(-5,25,by=0.1)
x = seq(5,20,by=0.2)

NAs <- rep(NA, length(x)*length(y))
z <- matrix(NAs, length(x), byrow = T)
for(i in seq(1,length(x))) {
    for(j in seq(1,length(y))) {
        val = x[i] * y[j]
        z[i,j] = val
        if(z[i,j] < 0.02) {
            z[i,j] = NA
        }
    }
}

col <- rainbow(length(z))[rank(z)] # This line changed

open3d()
persp3d(x,y,z,color=col,xlim=c(5,20),ylim=c(5,10),axes=T,box=F,xlab="X Axis",ylab="Y Axis",zlab="Z Axis")
share|improve this answer
    
That's what I thought at first too, but the question mentions having both x and z represented with colour, x as it is now and then z as the shade/saturation on top of that. –  Marius Jan 29 '13 at 1:37
    
Ah! I didn't see that. Hmm.. This will be much more complicated with a matrix of colors. –  N8TRO Jan 29 '13 at 1:50
    
@Marius: right, I need both x and z represented with color... –  CodeGuy Jan 29 '13 at 3:38
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.