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For example,

this doesn't work (Firefox 21, IE8):

<?php
function flush_buffers(){
    ob_end_flush();
    ob_flush();
    flush();
    ob_start();
}  
ob_start();
echo 'Text 1<br />';
flush_buffers();
Sleep(2);
echo 'Text 2<br />';
flush_buffers();
Sleep(2);
echo 'Text 3<br />';
flush_buffers();
Sleep(2);
echo 'Text 4<br />';
?>

But this one works:

<?php
function flush_buffers(){
    echo str_pad('',4096);
    ob_end_flush();
    ob_flush();
    flush();
    ob_start();
}  
ob_start();
echo 'Text 1<br />';
flush_buffers();
Sleep(2);
echo 'Text 2<br />';
flush_buffers();
Sleep(2);
echo 'Text 3<br />';
flush_buffers();
Sleep(2);
echo 'Text 4<br />';
?>

I have PHP 5.4.11 VC9 and Apache 2.4.3 (apacheLounge) running on Win XP SP3.

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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Some browsers include their own internal buffer in order to download and display more efficiently with less choppiness. In most cases, this buffer is 4Kb, or 4096 bytes.

What str_pad('',4096) does is write 4,096 spaces to the output. Since it's HTML, these spaces collapse into a single space.

Overall, this behaviour should NOT be relied upon. Browsers are for viewing webpages, not bastardising into console terminals.

Also, why are you writing </br>? There is no such thing as an end <br> tag, and the self-closing version is <br />

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Lol, you're right with those </br>. The code is not mine, but I should have seen it. –  Oriol Jan 29 '13 at 2:06
    
"Overall, this behaviour should NOT be relied upon". Then, what should I do, use AJAX? –  Oriol Jan 29 '13 at 2:10
    
It depends on what you're trying to do, exactly. AJAX could be one way to do it, but really I'd need to know more about what you're doing to make a valid suggestion. –  Niet the Dark Absol Jan 29 '13 at 2:17
    
I want PHP to connect to a sometimes slow host (not mine) to read some xml files (each time they are different, I can't store them) and use xpath to get some data. I thought that I could use flush to send the data from the first xml while it hasn't read the second one yet. –  Oriol Jan 29 '13 at 15:56
    
Hm... Slow servers are a pain to work with. Although, have you ever used a flight search website? They have a loading screen telling you it'll be a few minutes, usually accompanied by useful links and information such as car rentals and hotels you can look at while you wait. Is there any way you could do something similar? –  Niet the Dark Absol Jan 29 '13 at 17:40
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It is because the render engine of the browser need to get enough data when it decide to render the content to the screen. And how much data is needed is the decided by the browser.

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In addition to specifying your browser version, you should've also specified the web server PHP is running on. That's where the output buffering is probably happening, after all.

If you read the documentation on flush, you'll see that it's not a guaranteed operation. Kind of like a disk write where even if you have the library and the OS cooperating, there's still the disk hardware to (possibly) buffer it. Only the most meticulous (and thus nigh-impossible to port) methods will work, and not even that is guaranteed.

Edit: Oh yes, the browser (or hell, some router or TCP stack in between) can do it, too.

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