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I've just run into a pathological case with HTML parsing. I've always thought that a <script> tag would run until the first closing </script> tag. But it turns out this is not always the case.

This is valid:

<script><!--
alert('<script></script>');
--></script>

And even this is valid:

<script><!--
alert('<script></script>');
</script>

But this is not:

<script><!--
alert('</script>');
--></script>

And neither is this:

<script>
alert('<script></script>');
</script>

This behavior is consistent in Firefox and Chrome. So, as hard as it is to believe, browsers seem to accept an open+close script tag inside an html comment inside a script tag. So the question is how do browser really parse script tags? This matters because the HTML parsing library I'm using, Nokogiri, assumed the obvious (but incorrect) until-the-first-closing-tag rule and did not handle this edge case. I imagine most other libraries would not handle it either.

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Put your scripts in a separate file. –  Kevin Boucher Jan 29 '13 at 2:04
    
The question has to do with html parsing, in other words I'm dealing with other people's web pages. –  Daniel Jan 29 '13 at 2:06
2  
Edge cases of HTML parsing... I'm going to go cry myself to sleep now, best of luck :D –  jbabey Jan 29 '13 at 2:07
1  
@Daniel Yes, and my point was to take the actual JavaScript code out of the HTML parsing by placing it in a referenced JS file. –  Kevin Boucher Jan 29 '13 at 2:07
2  
This is a blow-by-blow description of the state machine the browsers are supposed to use: whatwg.org/specs/web-apps/current-work/multipage/…. TBH, I'm not sure if it supports what you are seeing or not. –  Tim Medora Jan 29 '13 at 2:46

4 Answers 4

All the examples are invalid as per the HTML 4.01 specification: the content of script is declared as CDATA, and the description of CDATA says: “Although the STYLE and SCRIPT elements use CDATA for their data model, for these elements, CDATA must be handled differently by user agents. Markup and entities must be treated as raw text and passed to the application as is. The first occurrence of the character sequence "

As you have observed, browsers might not enforce this rule but instead recognize pairs of start and end tags, in some situations. From the spec perspective, this is handling of invalid documents, i.e. error processing. It is not clear what exactly they are doing here and why. It seems to depend on the presence of <!--, which should not have any effect on HTML 4.01 parsing (it is not a comment opener in CDATA content).

In XHTML, partly different rules apply, because in XHTML, <!-- opens a comment within the content of a script element.

As an aside, all the examples are invalid HTML 4.01 and invalid XHTML due to the lack of the type attribute in script. The attribute is not needed (browsers default to treating the content as JavaScript), but it’s required by those specs.

In HTML5, other rules apply. They are rather complicated, and they are supposed to describe browser behavior. In addition to imposing restrictions on content (forbidding e.g. <!-- without matching -->), HTML5 also specifies parsing rules.

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Content of tags is still HTML, unless you mark it as not being HTML. In HTML, <word> is taken to be a tag, < needs to be written as &lt; to avoid this behaviour. Alternately, you want to make the contents of <script> a text node; use this formula:

<script type="text/javascript">
//<![CDATA[
  // your code, with < and & and "", woohoo!
//]]>
</script>

<![CDATA[ ... ]]> delineates a part of the document as pure text, without markup. Slashes are there so JavaScript wouldn't get confused; the first set of slashes is outside CDATA, but they're HTML-safe, so there's no problem.

EDIT: Just realised the question is about parsing, not writing HTML. Oops.

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1  
You'd be right in XHTML and maybe even HTML 4, but HTML 5 handles script tags specially. –  icktoofay Jan 29 '13 at 6:46

Hypothetically, if the tags are parsed first and the comments are parsed later, the HTML parser would give you those results.

(I don't mean this is necessarily the case, just a possible explanation only.)

1st case

<script><!--
alert('<script></script>');
--></script>

There is a set of <script></script> inside another <script></script>. The parser may ignore the name of the tags first and just checks for proper opening and closing of those tags. Then it parse the comments.

<script><!--
--></script>

So this is valid.

2nd case

<script><!--
alert('<script></script>');
</script>

There is a set of <script></script> inside another <script></script>. Then it parse the comments.

<script><!--

The comment extends all the way to the end of the document. This is not strictly valid, but the browser handles it correctly.

3rd case

<script><!--
alert('</script>');
--></script>

There is a single closing tag inside the set of <script></script>. It is invalidated before it parse out the </script> as comments.

4th case

<script>
alert('<script></script>');
</script>

There is a set of <script></script> inside another <script></script>, and there are no comments. The first pass is valid but then it really looks into the tags to see what they are. It may not accept a pair of <script> tags inside another one so it invalidates the case.

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I think in the 4th case the script tag is closed prematurely, and everything after the first </script> goes to a sibling node, while the second, "unmatched" </script> is ignored. –  bfavaretto Jan 29 '13 at 2:58
    
And the 3rd case gives a SyntaxError in Chrome (maybe the first </script> closes the script too, not sure here). –  bfavaretto Jan 29 '13 at 3:00
up vote 0 down vote accepted

After poring over the links given by Tim and Jukka I came to the following answer:

  • after the opening <script> tag, the parser goes to data1 state
  • if <!-- is encountered while in data1 state, switch to data2 state
  • if --> is encountered while in any state, switch to data1 state
  • if <script[\s/>] is encountered while in data2 state, switch to data3 state
  • if </script[\s/>] is encountered while in data3 state, switch to data2 state
  • if </script[\s/>] is encountered while in any other state, stop parsing
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