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I have a graph that is represented by three different sized circles, based on the presence of a given element in the result set. The first circle is always set to 100%, being this is the largest the circle can be, the other two are relative % to the largest one.

The problem is that I am trying to use css to render them and I do not know the math necessary to figure out how to make them all "stick" together along their sides.

The known pieces will be the radius of each circle, and the largest one is always returned first.

Here is an example of what I’m trying to accomplish:

enter image description here

How can I accomplish this mathematically such that i can supply each circle with a margin-top and margin-left that will position them in this way?

I can position the largest circle at 0,0, and the second largest at half the difference between the 2 diameters, making the center points line up. The real challenge is the third smallest circle, in knowing where to position it based on the other two circles' positions.

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Any chance you can use a canvas element? –  mrtsherman Jan 29 '13 at 2:44
    
I was trying to avoid this because of lousy IE support. Is there a way to do that x-browser easily? –  Steve-O-Rama Jan 29 '13 at 2:45
1  
This sounds pretty complex based on this page mathworld.wolfram.com/ApolloniusProblem.html. You would probably have better luck asking at math.stackexchange.com. –  mrtsherman Jan 29 '13 at 2:55
    
That looks like way more than I want to code out. There's got to be a better way! I have updated the question to reflect some more possible known values. –  Steve-O-Rama Jan 29 '13 at 3:03
    
Well you have to do the math to position the circles. I gave up as soon as I saw it hadn't been solved by Euclid and took until 1968 for a solution to be devised. The only 'easy' way is if you had a 2d constraint system to leverage. I worked for a major CAD company and I am not aware of a 2d constraint solver written in javascript. –  mrtsherman Jan 29 '13 at 3:06

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Build triangle with sides radius0, radius1 and radius2 and calculate the third vertex coordinate (smallest circle center). I've used formula (23) from here in my calculation. There is Delphi code, but I hope the principle is clear.

var
  r0, r1, r2: Integer;
  x0, x1, x2, y0, y1, y2: Integer;
  a, b, c, ca: Double;
begin
  //some intialization
  Canvas.FillRect(ClientRect);
  Randomize;
  r0 := 200;
  r1 := Round(r0 * (0.25 + 0.75 * Random));
  r2 := Round(r1 * (0.25 + 0.75 * Random));

  //circle centers' coordinates
  //biggest
  x0 := r0;
  y0 := r0;

  //second
  x1 := x0 + r0 + r1;
  y1 := y0;

  //triangle sides
  c := r0 + r1;
  b := r0 + r2;
  a := r1 + r2;

  //x-shift
  ca := (c * c + b * b - a * a) / (2.0 * c);
  x2 := x0 + Round(ca);

  //y-shift is the height of triangle
  //Pythagor's rule
  y2 := y0 + Round(Sqrt(b * b - ca * ca));

  //draw calculated circles
  Canvas.Ellipse(x0 - r0, y0 - r0, x0 + r0 + 1, y0 + r0 + 1);
  Canvas.Ellipse(x1 - r1, y1 - r1, x1 + r1 + 1, y1 + r1 + 1);
  Canvas.Ellipse(x2 - r2, y2 - r2, x2 + r2 + 1, y2 + r2 + 1);

example output: enter image description here

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I was just putting the finishing touches on my answer when I saw yours... which is nearly identical to mine. Ah well. +1 –  Adam Cadien Jan 29 '13 at 4:12
    
Finally reimplemented this in python + css and it's great! Thanks! –  Steve-O-Rama Jan 29 '13 at 16:32

Ok, lets go through each one... lets assume your 100% A circle has radius x (so B be would be Bx and c might be Cx, B = .7 and C = .3 as an example).

As another aside I would actually have a <div style="position: relative"></div> and then your circles would be <div style="position: absolute, top: 0, left: 0"></div> instead of using margin-top/margin-left

ANYWAYS. Obviously will have top/left = 0.

From your picture it looks like the centers of A and B line up... This would mean B would have left = 2x and top = (1 - B)x

C is the hard part... I'll just put up a quick paint triangle up for reference

First lets use the Law of Cosines to find the angle at A

(B + C)² = (1 + B)² + (1 + C)² - 2(1 + B)(1 + C)cos A

cosA = (BC - B - C - 1)/(BC + B + C + 1)

Using normal Trigonometry we can also get the height...

sin A = h / (1 + C)

Using the rule

sin² A + cos² A = 1

We can combine and get

h = (1 + C) √ (1 - cos² A)

Of course to get the top we need to add 1 and minus C

top = ((1 + C) √ (1 - cos² A) + 1 - C)x

Using trig again we can get the left side...

cos A = l / (1 + C)

l = (1 + C)cos A

Of course to get left we have to add 1 and take C...

left = ((1 + C)cos A + 1 - C)x

I have created an example using border-radius to create the circles with B = .7 and C = .3 and x = 50px: http://jsfiddle.net/FelixJorkowski/xArpR/

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How much did you enjoy figuring that out? –  mrtsherman Jan 29 '13 at 5:11
1  
|------------ this much --------------| I was just mostly pleased after typing it all out that the actual example I gave looked ok! –  Felix Jan 29 '13 at 5:19

Here is my python implementation of @MBo 's code

r0 = 100
r1 = 50
r2 = 25

#circles
#biggest
x0 = r0
y0 = r0

#2nd
x1 = x0 + r0 + r1
y1 = y0

#sides
c = r0 + r1
b = r0 + r2
a = r1 + r2

#x-shift
ca = (c * c + b * b - a * a) / (2.0 * c)
x2 = x0 + round(ca)

#y-shift is the height of triangle
y2 = y0 + round(math.sqrt(b * b - ca * ca))

left_a = x0 - r0
top_a = y0 - r0
width_a = r0 * 2
border_radius_a = width_a / 2

left_b = x1 - r1
top_b = y1 - r1
width_b = r1 * 2
border_radius_b = width_b / 2

left_c = x2 - r2
top_c = y2 - r2
width_c = r2 * 2
border_radius_c = width_c / 2
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A solution using a Canvas element in case other's stumble on this.

http://jsfiddle.net/5mgLY/

var centerpoint = 50;
var radius = randomFromInterval(30, 50);                //starting circle between 30 and 50
var radius2 = radius * randomFromInterval(5, 9) / 10;   //between .5 and .9 of starting circle
var radius3 = radius2 * randomFromInterval(3, 8) / 10;  //between .3 and .8 of medium circle

var c=document.getElementById("myCanvas");
var ctx=c.getContext("2d");

//draw the big circle
ctx.beginPath();
ctx.arc(centerpoint,centerpoint,radius,0,2*Math.PI,false);
ctx.fillStyle = 'green';
ctx.fill();
ctx.stroke();

//draw the medium circle
ctx.beginPath();
ctx.arc(centerpoint + radius + radius2,50,radius2,0,2*Math.PI);
ctx.fillStyle = 'red';
ctx.fill();
ctx.stroke();

//find the length of each side of the triangle that forms between the three circles
var hypotenuse = radius + radius2;
var side1 = radius + radius3;
var side2 = radius2 + radius3;

//get x and y offsets
var xOffset = ((hypotenuse*hypotenuse) + (side1*side1)  - (side2*side2)) / (2 * hypotenuse);
var yOffset = Math.sqrt(side1 * side1 - xOffset * xOffset);

//draw the small circle
ctx.beginPath();
ctx.arc(centerpoint + xOffset,centerpoint + yOffset,radius3,0,2*Math.PI);
ctx.fillStyle = 'blue';
ctx.fill();
ctx.stroke();

function randomFromInterval(from,to)
{
    return Math.floor(Math.random()*(to-from+1)+from);
}

function toDegrees (angle) {
  return angle * (180 / Math.PI);
}
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