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I have the following test..

@RunWith(SpringJUnit4ClassRunner.class)
@ContextConfiguration(locations = {"/schedule-agents-config-context.xml"})
@TransactionConfiguration(transactionManager = "transactionManager", defaultRollback = true)
@Transactional
public class H2TransactionNotWorkingTest extends SubmitAgentIntegratedTestBase {
    private static final int FIVE_SUBMISSIONS = 5;

    @Autowired
    private ApplicationSubmissionInfoDao submissionDao;

    private FakeApplicationSubmissionInfoRepository fakeRepo;

    @Before
    public void setUp() {
        fakeRepo = fakeRepoThatNeverFails(submissionDao, null);
        submitApplication(FIVE_SUBMISSIONS, fakeRepo);
    }

    @Test
    @Rollback(true)
    public void shouldSaveSubmissionInfoWhenFailureInDatabase() {
        assertThat(fakeRepo.retrieveAll(), hasSize(FIVE_SUBMISSIONS));

    }

    @Test
    @Rollback(true)
    public void shouldSaveSubmissionInfoWhenFailureInXmlService() {
        assertThat(fakeRepo.retrieveAll().size(), equalTo(FIVE_SUBMISSIONS));
    }
}

...and the following config...

   <jdbc:embedded-database id="dataSource" type="H2">
        <jdbc:script location="classpath:/db/h2-schema.sql" />
    </jdbc:embedded-database>

    <tx:annotation-driven transaction-manager="transactionManager"/>

    <bean id="transactionManager" class="org.springframework.jdbc.datasource.DataSourceTransactionManager">
        <property name="dataSource" ref="dataSource"/>
    </bean>

    <bean id="transactionalSessionFactory"
          class="org.springframework.orm.hibernate3.annotation.AnnotationSessionFactoryBean">
        <property name="dataSource" ref="dataSource"/>
        <property name="hibernateProperties">
            <props>
                <prop key="hibernate.dialect">org.hibernate.dialect.H2Dialect</prop>
                <prop key="hibernate.show_sql">false</prop>
                <prop key="hibernate.cache.use_second_level_cache">false</prop>
                <prop key="hibernate.cache.use_query_cache">false</prop>
            </props>
        </property>
        <property name="namingStrategy">
            <bean class="org.hibernate.cfg.ImprovedNamingStrategy"/>
        </property>
        <property name="configurationClass" value="org.hibernate.cfg.AnnotationConfiguration"/>
        <property name="packagesToScan" value="au.com.mycomp.life.snapp"/>
    </bean>

    <bean id="regionDependentProperties" class="org.springframework.core.io.ClassPathResource">
        <constructor-arg value="region-dependent-service-test.properties"/>
    </bean

>

I have also set auto commit to false in the sql script

SET AUTOCOMMIT FALSE;

There are not REQUIRES_NEW in the code. Why is the rollback not working in the test?

Cheers Prabin

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5 Answers 5

Try this:

remove the org.springframework.jdbc.datasource.DataSourceTransactionManager

<bean id="transactionManager" class="org.springframework.jdbc.datasource.DataSourceTransactionManager">
    <property name="dataSource" ref="dataSource"/>
</bean>

and replace it with the org.springframework.orm.jpa.JpaTransactionManager

<bean id="transactionManager" class="org.springframework.orm.jpa.JpaTransactionManager">
    <property name="dataSource" ref="dataSource"/>
</bean>

or you inject an EntityManagerFactory instead ...

<bean id="transactionManager" class="org.springframework.orm.jpa.JpaTransactionManager">
    <property name="entityManagerFactory" ref="entityManagerFactory" />
</bean>

you need an EntityManagerFactory then, like the following

<bean id="entityManagerFactory"
    class="org.springframework.orm.jpa.LocalContainerEntityManagerFactoryBean">
    <property name="dataSource" ref="dataSource" />
    <property name="jpaVendorAdapter">
        <bean id="jpaAdapter"
            class="org.springframework.orm.jpa.vendor.HibernateJpaVendorAdapter">
            <property name="showSql" value="true" />
            <property name="generateDdl" value="true" />
        </bean>
    </property>
</bean>
share|improve this answer

I'm experiencing similar problems, I'm also using TestNG + Spring test support and Hibernate. What happens is that Hibernate disables autocommit on the connection before the transaction begins and it remembers the original autocommit setting:

org.hibernate.engine.transaction.internal.jdbc#JdbcTransaction:

@Override
protected void doBegin() {
    try {
        if ( managedConnection != null ) {
            throw new TransactionException( "Already have an associated managed connection" );
        }
        managedConnection = transactionCoordinator().getJdbcCoordinator().getLogicalConnection().getConnection();
        wasInitiallyAutoCommit = managedConnection.getAutoCommit();
        LOG.debugv( "initial autocommit status: {0}", wasInitiallyAutoCommit );
        if ( wasInitiallyAutoCommit ) {
            LOG.debug( "disabling autocommit" );
            managedConnection.setAutoCommit( false );
        }
    }
    catch( SQLException e ) {
        throw new TransactionException( "JDBC begin transaction failed: ", e );
    }

    isDriver = transactionCoordinator().takeOwnership();
}

Later on, after rolling back the transaction, it will release the connection. Doing so hibernate will also restore the original autocommit setting on the connection (so that others who might be handed out the same connection start with the original setting). However, setting the autocommit during a transaction triggers an explicit commit, see JavaDoc

In the code below you can see this happening. The rollback is issued and finally the connection is released in releaseManagedConnection. Here the autocommit will be re-set which triggers a commit:

org.hibernate.engine.transaction.internal.jdbc#JdbcTransaction:

    @Override
protected void doRollback() throws TransactionException {
    try {
        managedConnection.rollback();
        LOG.debug( "rolled JDBC Connection" );
    }
    catch( SQLException e ) {
        throw new TransactionException( "unable to rollback against JDBC connection", e );
    }
    finally {
        releaseManagedConnection();
    }
}


private void releaseManagedConnection() {
    try {
        if ( wasInitiallyAutoCommit ) {
            LOG.debug( "re-enabling autocommit" );
            managedConnection.setAutoCommit( true );
        }
        managedConnection = null;
    }
    catch ( Exception e ) {
        LOG.debug( "Could not toggle autocommit", e );
    }
}

This should not be a problem normally, because afaik the transaction should have ended after the rollback. But even more, if I issue a commit after a rollback it should not be committing any changes if there were no changes between the rollback and the commit, from the javadoc on commit:

Makes all changes made since the previous commit/rollback permanent and releases any database locks currently held by this Connection object. This method should be used only when auto-commit mode has been disabled.

In this case there were no changes between rollback and commit, since the commit (triggered indirectly by re-setting autocommit) happens only a few statements later.

A work around seems to be to disable autocommit. This will avoid restoring autocommit (since it was not enabled in the first place) and thus prevent the commit from happening. You can do this by manipulating the id for the embedded datasource bean. The id is not only used for the identification of the datasource, but also for the databasename:

<jdbc:embedded-database id="dataSource;AUTOCOMMIT=OFF" type="H2"/>

This will create a database with name "dataSource". The extra parameter will be interpreted by H2. Spring will also create a bean with name "dataSource;AUTOCOMMIT=OFF"". If you depend on the bean names for injection, you can create an alias to make it cleaner:

<alias name="dataSource;AUTOCOMMIT=OFF" alias="dataSource"/>

(there isn't a cleaner way to manipulate the embedded-database namespace config, I wish Spring team would have made this a bit better configurable)

Note: disabling the autocommit via the script (<jdbc:script location="...") might not work, since there is no guarantee that the same connection will be re-used for your test.

Note: this is not a real fix but merely a workaround. There is still something wrong that cause the data to be committed after a rollback occured.

----EDIT----

After searching I found out the real problem. If you are using HibernateTransactionManager (as I was doing) and you use your database via the SessionFactory (Hibernate) and directly via the DataSource (plain JDBC), you should pass both the SessionFactory and the DataSource to the HibernateTransactionManager. From the Javadoc:

Note: To be able to register a DataSource's Connection for plain JDBC code, this instance >needs to be aware of the DataSource (setDataSource(javax.sql.DataSource)). The given >DataSource should obviously match the one used by the given SessionFactory.

So eventually I did this:

<bean id="transactionManager" class="org.springframework.orm.hibernate4.HibernateTransactionManager">
    <property name="sessionFactory" ref="sessionFactory" />
    <property name="dataSource" ref="dataSource" />
</bean>

And everything worked for me.

Note: the same goes for JpaTransactionManager! If you both use the EntityManager and perform raw JDBC access using the DataSource, you should supply the DataSource separately next to he EMF. Also don't forget to use DataSourecUtils to obtain a connection (or JDBCTemplate which uses DataSourceUtils internally to obtain the connection)

----EDIT----

Aight, while the above did solve my problem, it is not the real cause after all :) In normal cases when using Spring's LocalSessionFactoryBean, setting the datasource will have no effect since it's done for you.

If the SessionFactory was configured with LocalDataSourceConnectionProvider, i.e. by Spring's LocalSessionFactoryBean with a specified "dataSource", the DataSource will be auto-detected: You can still explicitly specify the DataSource, but you don't need to in this case.

In my case the problem was that we created a caching factory bean that extended LocalSessionFactoryBean. We only use this during testing to avoid booting the SessionFactory multiple times. As told before, Spring test support does boot multiple application contexts if the resource key is different. This caching mechanism mitigates the overhead completely and ensures only 1 SF is loaded.

This means that the same SessionFactory is returned for different booted application contexts. Also, the datasource passed to the SF will be the datasource from the first context that booted the SF. This is all fine, but the DataSource itself is a new "object" for each new application context. This creates a discrepancy:

The transaction is started by the HibernateTransactionManager. The datasource used for transaction synchronization is obtained from the SessionFactory (so again: the cached SessionFactory with the DataSource instance from the application context the SessionFactory was initially loaded from). When using the DataSource in your test (or production code) directly, you'll be using the instance belonging to the app context active at that point. This instance does not match the instance used for the transaction synchronization (extracted from the SF). This result into problems as the connection obtained will not be properly participating in the transaction.

By explicitly setting the datasource on the transactionmanager this appeared to be solved since the post initialization will not obtain the datasource from the SF but use the injected one instead. The appropriate way for me was to adjust the caching mechanism and replace the datasource in the cached SF with the one from the current appcontext each time the SF was returned from cache.

Conclusion: you can ignore my post:) as long as you're using HibernateTransactionManager or JtaTransactionManager in combination with some kind of Spring support factory bean for the SF or EM you should be fine, even when mixing vanilla JDBC with Hibernate. In the latter case don't forget to obtain connections via DataSourceUtils (or use JDBCTemplate).

share|improve this answer

You haven't shown all the pieces to the puzzle. My guess at this point would be that your ApplicationSubmissionInfoDao is transactional and is committing on its own, though I'd think that would conflict with the test transactions if everything were configured properly. To get more of an answer, ask a more complete question. The best thing would be to post an SSCCE.

share|improve this answer

Thanks Ryan

The test code is something like this.

@Test
@Rollback(true)
public void shouldHave5ApplicationSubmissionInfo() {
    for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
        hibernateTemplate.saveOrUpdate(new ApplicationSubmissionInfoBuilder()
                .with(NOT_PROCESSED)
                .build());
    }
    assertThat(repo.retrieveAll(), hasSize(5));
}

@Test
@Rollback(true)
public void shouldHave5ApplicationSubmissionInfoAgainButHas10() {
    for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
        hibernateTemplate.saveOrUpdate(new ApplicationSubmissionInfoBuilder()
                .with(NOT_PROCESSED)
                .build());
    }
    assertThat(repo.retrieveAll(), hasSize(5));
}

I figure out that embedded DB define using jdbc:embedded-database don't have transaction support. When I used commons DBCP to define the datasource and set default auto commit to false, it worked.

<bean id="dataSource" class="org.apache.commons.dbcp.BasicDataSource" scope="singleton">
    <property name="driverClassName" value="org.h2.Driver" />
    <property name="url" value="jdbc:h2:~/snappDb"/>
    <property name="username" value="sa"/>
    <property name="password" value=""/>
    <property name="defaultAutoCommit" value="false" />
    <property name="connectionInitSqls" value=""/>
</bean>
share|improve this answer

I have faced the same problem but I have finally solved it albeit I don't use Hibernate (shouldn't really matter).

The key item making it work was to extend the proper Spring unit test class, i.e. AbstractTransactionalJUnit4SpringContextTests. Note the "Transactional" in the class name. Thus the skeleton of a working transactional unit test class looks like:

@ContextConfiguration(locations = {"classpath:/com/.../testContext.xml"})
public class Test extends AbstractTransactionalJUnit4SpringContextTests {

    @Test
    @Transactional
    public void test() {
    }
}

The associated XML context file has the following items contained:

<jdbc:embedded-database id="dataSource" type="H2" />

<tx:annotation-driven transaction-manager="transactionManager"/>
<bean id="transactionManager" class="org.springframework.jdbc.datasource.DataSourceTransactionManager">
    <property name="dataSource" ref="dataSource"></property>
</bean>

Using this setup the modifications by each test method is properly rolled back.

Regards, Ola

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