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I have the following code currently:

using boost::filesystem;

directory_iterator end_iter;
for (directory_iteratory dir_iter("/some/path/"); dir_iter != end_iter; ++dir_iter)
{
    functionCall(some_variable, dir_iter);
}

Now, I want to parallelize that for loop. Normally this is easily done with openmp, but the directory iterator complicates things. I tried the following, but this isn't working.

using boost::filesystem;

boost::thread_group threads;

directory_iterator end_iter;
for (directory_iteratory dir_iter("/some/path/"); dir_iter != end_iter; ++dir_iter)
{
    boost::thread *thread = new boost::thread(functionCall, some_variable, dir_iter);
    threads.add(thread);
}

threads.join_all();

So, that doesn't work. What's the right way to do this?

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3  
Well, you definitely don't want one thread per file/directory... –  ildjarn Jan 29 '13 at 3:38
    
@ildjam Why not? I'm processing a series of intermediate files. That's exactly what I want. The process for each file is independent and sequential, and very time consuming. I'd like to parallelize that. –  Jim Jan 29 '13 at 4:14
1  
Because if the work is computationally expensive and the number of files is higher than your physical core count, you'll lose efficiency to context switching; and if the work is not computationally expensive, then your bottleneck is I/O anyway, and increasing I/O activity will just make things worse. –  ildjarn Jan 29 '13 at 4:27
    
You're right, but in that scenario there must be some kind of construct for only launching as many threads as there are cores, and launching a new thread when one has finished to keep all of the CPU busy? –  Jim Jan 29 '13 at 12:31
    
Not built into the standard library, no, but it sounds like you may be interested in TBB or PPL. –  ildjarn Jan 29 '13 at 16:00
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