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Difference between Statement and PreparedStatement

I have confused with Statement and PreparedStatement in JDBC.Is PreparedStatement is version of Statement? or any other difference in that ? Can any body clear that question. thanks.

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marked as duplicate by home, MadProgrammer, Andrew Thompson, Brian Roach, EJP Jan 29 '13 at 6:40

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What happened to Google.com? –  Pradeep Simha Jan 29 '13 at 5:07
    
Or the Javadoc? –  EJP Jan 29 '13 at 6:40

1 Answer 1

From Using Prepared Statements of the Java official tutorials

Sometimes it is more convenient to use a PreparedStatement object for sending SQL statements to the database. This special type of statement is derived from the more general class, Statement, that you already know.

If you want to execute a Statement object many times, it usually reduces execution time to use a PreparedStatement object instead.

The main feature of a PreparedStatement object is that, unlike a Statement object, it is given a SQL statement when it is created. The advantage to this is that in most cases, this SQL statement is sent to the DBMS right away, where it is compiled. As a result, the PreparedStatement object contains not just a SQL statement, but a SQL statement that has been precompiled. This means that when the PreparedStatement is executed, the DBMS can just run the PreparedStatement SQL statement without having to compile it first.

Although PreparedStatement objects can be used for SQL statements with no parameters, you probably use them most often for SQL statements that take parameters. The advantage of using SQL statements that take parameters is that you can use the same statement and supply it with different values each time you execute it. Examples of this are in the following sections.

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