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I met an Xpath like this:

from xml.etree import ElementTree

with open('podcasts.opml', 'rt') as f:
    tree = ElementTree.parse(f)

for node in tree.findall('.//outline'):
    pass

I know that //means any matches, but what does the . before // means? Does that mean relative path? But what is the current path in the codes? Is it the root path? Then could it be written as ///outline?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

but what does the . before // means?

It means "the current node".

But what is the current path in the codes? Is it the root path? Then could it be written as ///outline?

Current path is the node you're searching from. It's not necessary the root (but for tree in the above example it is).

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No, "///" outline is incorrect, even though it appears logical. You want "//outline". –  Michael Kay Jan 29 '13 at 9:14
    
@MichaelKay, my bad... Thanks for the correction. –  nameless Jan 29 '13 at 9:26

A location step of . is short for self::node(). This is particularly useful in conjunction with //. For example, the location path .//para is short for self::node()/descendant-or-self::node()/child::para and so will select all para descendant elements of the context node.

Quoted from http://www.w3.org/TR/xpath/

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