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I have a .NET 2.0 console application running on a Windows Server GoDaddy VPS in the Visual Studio 2010 IDE in debug mode (F5).

The application periodically freezes (as if the garbage collector has temporarily suspended execution) however on the rare occasion it never resumes execution!

I've been diagonosing this for months, and am running out of ideas.

  • The application runs as fast as it can (it uses 100% CPU usage), but at normal priority. It is also multi-threaded.
  • When the application freezes, I can unfreeze it using the VS2010 IDE by pausing/unpausing the process (since it's running in the debugger).
  • The location of last execution, when I pause the frozen process, seems irrelevant.
  • While frozen, the CPU usage is still 100%.
  • Upon unfreezing it, it runs perfectly fine until the next freeze.
  • The server might run 70 days between freezes, or it might only make it 24 hours.
  • Memory usage remains relatively constant; no evidence of any sort of memory leak.

Anyone have any tips for diagnosing what exactly is happening?

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No real help but it puzzles me: why are you running an app in the debugger from VS for 70 days? What's wrong with running it as a release build, which would give you more performance, less overhead and might free you from issues caused by the debugger, as you experience them at the moment? –  Krumelur Jan 29 '13 at 7:03
    
@Krumelur I usually commit patches to the code on a weekly basis, but there was one point in time where I had not committed any code for a couple months. I don't want to run the app without the debugger attached unless there's reason to believe the debugger might be the culprit. –  Mr. Smith Jan 29 '13 at 7:08
9  
well, it would be easy to find out by NOT running it with the debugger and see if it's still going to fail. –  Krumelur Jan 29 '13 at 7:13
2  
@Krumelur Waiting potentially 70 days for the next freeze does not sound like an easy way to find out. In the meanwhile there's no debugger attached to diagnose any other issues that might occur. –  Mr. Smith Jan 29 '13 at 7:16
1  
It's pretty difficult to say something with such abstract problem description. I would suggest following: 1. Run your program without debugger. You can attach debugger at any time to running program to troubleshoot your issues. 2. Take dump of your process when it freezes. Investigate the dump using visual studio or with WinDBG + sos extension. Or put the dump somewhere and post link to it here. PDB files produced with the build will also be needed. –  Sergey Zyuzin Feb 8 '13 at 5:40

3 Answers 3

It is also multi-threaded

That's the key part of the problem. You are describing a very typical way in which a multi-threaded program can misbehave. It is suffering from deadlock, one of the typical problems with threading.

It can be narrowed down a bit further from the info, clearly your process isn't completely frozen since it still consumes 100% cpu. You probably have a hot wait-loop in your code, a loop that spins on another thread signaling an event. Which is likely to induce an especially nasty variety of deadlock, a live-lock. Live-locks are very sensitive to timing, minor changes in the order in which code runs can bump it into a live-lock. And back out again.

Live-locks are extraordinarily difficult to debug since attempting to do so makes the condition disappear. Like attaching a debugger or breaking the code, enough to alter the thread timing and bump it out of the condition. Or adding logging statements to your code, a common strategy to debug threading problems. Which alters the timing due to the logging overhead which in turn can make the live-lock entirely disappear.

Nasty stuff and impossible to get help with such a problem from a site like SO since it is extremely dependent on the code. A thorough review of the code is often required to find the reason. And not infrequently a drastic rewrite. Good luck with it.

share|improve this answer
    
A deadlock seems extremely likely, but the only synchronization tool I use are lock statements (and never nested locks). The main-thread will lock a resource from a worker-thread before accessing it, and the worker-thread will lock (and only lock) its own resource before accessing it. There is no cross worker-thread locks; the main-thread is the only thread that accesses a worker-thread, and it only does so 1 at a time. Assuming this is true, how would the debugger unfreeze a deadlock between these two threads? Timing would not matter, nor would other threads. –  Mr. Smith Feb 1 '13 at 14:54
2  
Hmya, that doesn't help me help you. I need to see code and I have nothing to look at. But it is quite evident that the way you are talking about it shows a fundamental flaw in your approach. You never "lock a resource". References used in the lock statement should always be dedicated simple references of type object whose sole job is to keep track of the state of the code. It should never be a "resource", that causes deadlock. You cannot lock data, you can only block code. –  Hans Passant Feb 1 '13 at 15:04
    
@Mr. Smith : how would the debugger unfreeze a deadlock between these two threads? -> Just an example: The debugger stops in one process, giving the other Process time to finish. As soon as you come in and press F5, the other Process is long finished, the Deadlock is gone, everything runs smooth again. –  efkah Feb 1 '13 at 15:46
    
It's best practice to lock a private instance of an object, but it's certainly not a fundamental flaw to not do so; if you don't follow that best practice, then you need to very aware of the dangers of lock(this), lock(typeof(MyType)), and (the only one that's ever fooled me) lock(some_instance_of_a_string). –  Mr. Smith Feb 1 '13 at 15:58
6  
It doesn't cost anything to do it right. But that's not very relevant, thinking about this problem in terms of deadlock isn't productive. A deadlocked program doesn't burn 100% core. Strong signs are for live-lock, focus on trying to find an explanation why your program is going full bore but not getting anywhere and you'll have much better odds of diagnosing the problem. –  Hans Passant Feb 1 '13 at 17:01

Does the application have "dead lock recover/prevention" code? That is, locking with timout, then trying again, perhaps after sleep?

Does the application check error codes (return values or exceptions) and repeatedly retry in case of error anywhere?

Note that such looping can also happen through event loop, where your code is only in some event handler. It does not have to be an actual loop in your own code. Though this is probably not the case, if application is frozen, indicating blocked event loop.

If you have anything like above, you could try to mitigate the problem by making timeouts and sleeps to be of random interval, as well as adding short random-duration sleeps to cases where error might produce dead-/livelock. If such a loop is performance-sensitive, add a counter and only start sleeping with random, perhaps increasing interval after some number of failed retries. And make sure any sleep you add does not sleep while something is locked.

If the situation would happen more often, you could also use this to bisect your code and pinpoint which loops (because 100% CPU usage means, some very busy loops are spinning) are responsible. But from the rarity of issue, I gather you're going to be happy if the problem just goes away in practice ;)

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No deadlock recover/prevention code. There is a few places where I catch{} but I don't retry; I catch{} because these places can fail for ordinary (and well understood) reasons (socket closed, for example). In instances where I catch{} I don't attempt to resend, I just fail gracefully. I'd be happy if the problem went away, but I'd also accept an answer that explained what was causing this (even if there was no solution for it). –  Mr. Smith Feb 7 '13 at 23:08

Well three things here...

First of all, start using the server GC of .NET: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms229357.aspx . That will probably keep your application non-blocked.

Second, if you can do that on your VM: check for updates. This always seems evident, but I've seen numerous occasions where a simple windows update fixes strange issues.

Third, I'd like to make a point about the lifetime of an object, which can be one of the issues here. This is quite a long story what happens, so bear with me.

The lifetime of an object is basically construction - garbage collection - finalization. All three processes run in a separate thread. The GC passes data to the finalization thread which has a queue that calls the 'destructors'.

So what if you have a finalizer that does something strange, say something like:

public class FinalizerObject
{
    public FinalizerObject(int n)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Constructed {0}", n);
        this.n = n;
    }

    private int n;

    ~FinalizerObject()
    {
        while (true) { Console.WriteLine("Finalizing {0}...", n); System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(1000); }
    }
}

Because the finalizers run in a separate thread that processes the queue, having a single finalizer that does something stupid is a serious problem for your application. You can see this by using the above class 2 times:

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        SomeMethod();
        GC.Collect(GC.MaxGeneration);
        GC.WaitForFullGCComplete();
        Console.WriteLine("All done.");
        Console.ReadLine();
    }

    static void SomeMethod()
    {
        var obj2 = new FinalizerObject(1);
        var obj3 = new FinalizerObject(2);
    }

Notice how you end up with a small memory leak and if you remove the Thread.Sleep also with a 100% CPU process - even though your main thread is still responding. Because they're different threads, from here on it's quite easy to block the entire process - for example by using a lock:

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        SomeMethod();
        GC.Collect(GC.MaxGeneration);
        GC.WaitForFullGCComplete();
        Thread.Sleep(1000);
        lock (lockObject)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("All done.");
        }
        Console.ReadLine();
    }

    static object lockObject = new Program();

    static void SomeMethod()
    {
        var obj2 = new FinalizerObject(1, lockObject);
        var obj3 = new FinalizerObject(2, lockObject);
    }

    [...]

    ~FinalizerObject()
    {
        lock (lockObject) { while (true) { Console.WriteLine("Finalizing {0}...", n); System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(1000); } }
    }

So I can see you thinking 'Are you serious?'; the fact is that you might be doing something like this without even realizing this. This is where 'yield' comes into the picture:

IEnumerable's from 'yield' are actually IDisposable and as such implement the IDisposable pattern. Combine your 'yield' implementation with a lock, forget to call IDisposable by enumerating it with 'MoveNext' etc. and you get some pretty nasty behavior that reflects the above. Especially because finalizers are called from the finalization queue by a separate thread (!). Combine it with an endless loop or thread unsafe code, and you will get some pretty nasty unexpected behavior, which will be triggered in exceptional cases (when memory runs out, or when the GC things it should do something).

In other words: I'd check your disposables and finalizers and be very critical about them. Check if 'yield' has implicit finalizers and make sure you call IDisposable from the same thread. Some examples of things that you have be be wary of:

    try
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < 10; ++i)
        {
            yield return "foo";
        }
    }
    finally
    {
        // Called by IDisposable
    }

and

    lock (myLock) // 'lock' and 'using' also trigger IDisposable
    {
        yield return "foo";
    }
share|improve this answer
    
BTW: I've seen a real life case where the 'debugger' unfreeze you describe was actually issue (3) combined with unmanaged code (Socket IO in my case). Thread.Abort doesn't work in these cases, but your debugger sometimes does some strange things here. Unfortunately I cannot give you a minimum test case; it's very hard to reproduce. –  atlaste Feb 8 '13 at 9:19
    
I don't know which GC my environment is defaulting to (but only because I don't really care). Having said that, MSDN recommends not using server GC on single-core machines. Inaddition, it states concurrent GC (which would have reduced the need to block all threads) is not available if server GC is used with .NET 4.0 or earlier. I tend to run Windows Update on the machine every other week, so it's not behind on updates. Lastly, my code contains no finalizers. –  Mr. Smith Feb 9 '13 at 6:52
    
@Mr.Smith Hmm, that complicates things. To be honest I would be surprised if you don't have any implicit finalizers, they are used just about everywhere in the .NET framework... that said your reaction certainly complicates things. I would try using a tool called 'Managed Stack Explorer', and dump all stack traces of all threads when it freezes to get more insight in what happens exactly. Also you can try to run it in Mono instead of MS .NET to see if it is an error in the runtime. –  atlaste Feb 9 '13 at 12:40
    
Managed Stack Explorer looks like it would have been quite handy; I've since upgraded to VS2012 Express (which does have a proper multi-threaded debugger), so on the next freeze, I should be able to view the status of all threads. As for the suggestion about using Mono, this application requires Microsoft SQL Server. Though the .NET Socket code I've written has been ran on the Mono framework for years (in other pieces of the project) and is stable. –  Mr. Smith Feb 9 '13 at 20:05

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