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Is there a difference between null != something and something != null in Java. And if there is a difference then which one should I use and why??

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No Difference in java –  Subhrajyoti Majumder Jan 29 '13 at 8:42
    
It's called yoda condition. I answered why it's not-so-useful in Java but somewhat used in C/C++ etc. –  Blue Moon Jan 29 '13 at 8:49

7 Answers 7

its probably comming from the so-called joda-conditions where you write "bla" == myVariable instead of myVariable == "bla" because it could happen to accidentially write myVariable = "bla" which returns "bla" in some languages but also assign "bla" to myVariable

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Thank you! A colleague of mine explained it to me, and I couldn't remember what she had said! –  Nathan White Jan 29 '13 at 8:47

There's no difference between null != something and something != null. You must be thinking about the person.getName().equals("john") and the "john".equals(person.getName()) difference: the first one will throw a NullPointerException if getName() returns null, while the second won't. But this is not applicable for the example of your question.

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I just want to point out that the "Yoda condition" rationale for doing this (in languages like C & C++) does not apply in this (Java) case.

  1. Java does not allow general expressions to be used as statements, so both

     something == null;
    

    and

     null == something;
    

    would be compilation errors.

  2. The types of something == null and something = null are different; boolean and some reference type respectively. In this case, it means that both:

     if (something = null) {
         ...
     }
    

    and

     if (null = something) {
         ...
     }
    

    would be compilation errors.

In fact, I can't think of a realistic example where null == something would be compilation error and something == null would not. Hence, it doesn't achieve anything in terms of mistake-proofing.

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That's also the case in C#. Mistakenly used "=" in a boolean condition instead of "==" results in a compilation error. Yoda condition does nothing here. –  Jürgen Bayer Aug 2 '13 at 6:07

There is no difference, but some people use it for ease of readability in their code.

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Point of view of performance there will be no difference, both sides of the operator are executed any way. But for a more readable code second one seems more readable

  obj.getSomething().getAnotherThing().doSomething() != null

  null != obj.getSomething().getAnotherThing().doSomething()

But if you are going to just compare a variable or parameter this is more readable

  something != null

Of course this depends on sense of reader.

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In java if we compare any, always we have to place variables at left hand side and values are placed at right hand side...

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1  
I think that is convention. –  Subhrajyoti Majumder Jan 29 '13 at 8:46

They are both the same there is no difference.

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