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I want to run my program in C with bash script, also, I want my bash script to pass some values to my program in C. This is my C code (very simple, it reads as input math operations, for example: 2 + 3, saves it to file, and thats all):

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    int howMany = 0, i = 0;
    float num1, num2;
    char sign;

    FILE *fp;
    if((fp=fopen("operations.txt", "w"))==NULL)
    {
        exit(-1);
    }

    printf("How many math operations would you like to pass?\n> ");
    scanf("%d", &howMany);

    for(i=0; i<howMany; i++)
    {
        printf("Pass %d operations like this: {num1 sign num2}:\n> ", i+1);
        scanf("%f %c %f", &num1, &sign, &num2);

        fprintf(fp, "%f ", num1);
        fprintf(fp, "%c ", sign);
        fprintf(fp, "%f", num2);
        if(i < howMany-1)
            fprintf(fp, "\n");
    }

    fclose(fp);
    return 0;
}

Then, I have my bash script, I would like it to run my program in C and give it 9 math operations: 1+2, 3+4, ... 9+10. I did it like this:

#!/bin/bash

n=9
echo "$n" | ./app

for (( i=1; $i < 10; i++ )) ; do
       let "c=$i+1" 
       echo $i "+" $c | ./app
done

but theres a problem it doesnt work as I want it to. Please, help - only with this bash script, my C program works just great.

share|improve this question
    
"theres a problem it doesnt work as I want it to" - you should explain what the problem is so that we can help you! Have you tried printing some debug output in your C program? What result does that have? – jazzbassrob Jan 29 '13 at 8:55
    
echo "$n" | ./app after this your code will be closed, and in cycle you will run it on every iteration. If you want just to substitute stdin by pipe, first fill some data (for example, A="9;A="$A\n$i+$c\n", then run something like echo -e $A | ./app`. – Eddy_Em Jan 29 '13 at 8:56
up vote 3 down vote accepted

The problem is that you're executing your ./app several times, each time feeding it a small part of the whole.

You can group the commands and then pipe it all to one instance of your app like this:

#!/bin/bash
{ 
n=9
echo "$n" 

for (( i=1; $i < 10; i++ )) ; do
       let "c=$i+1" 
       echo $i "+" $c
done
} | ./app
share|improve this answer
    
perfect! thank you so much for help:) – Katie Jan 29 '13 at 11:12

It's because you're running independent instances of ./app, giving each less than the full amount of data it expects. You can get round it with something like:

(
    n=9
    echo "$n"

    for (( i=1; $i < 10; i++ )) ; do
        let "c=$i+1" 
        echo $i "+" $c
     done
) | ./app

This runs the entire set of commands within () as a single sub-shell and pipes the output of the lot into a single instance of your application.


An even better approach may be to use random data, such as with:

#!/bin/bash

(
    (( count = $RANDOM % 100  + 1 ))
    echo ${count}

    while [[ ${count} -gt 0 ]] ; do
        (( val1 = $RANDOM % 100 ))
        (( op   = $RANDOM % 2 + 1 ))
        (( val2 = $RANDOM % 100 ))
        op=$(echo '+-' | cut -c${op}-${op})
        echo ${val1} ${op} ${val2}
        (( count = count - 1 ))
    done
) | ./app

This will give you things like:

9
9 - 91
56 - 4
85 + 25
23 + 15
6 + 86
10 - 26
99 - 26
19 + 31
33 - 60

which may provide better coverage.

share|improve this answer
    
Beat you by about 45 seconds there ^^ – that other guy Jan 29 '13 at 9:03

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