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I'm developing on two different machines at the moment. On one gcc maps to gcc 4.6 and there is a gcc3 for whomever needs a really old version of gcc. On the other machine gcc maps to a v3 gcc and there is a gcc4 command for invoking the newer compiler.

The problem should be obvious - I want a single makefile for both machines, which basically means defining CC depending on whether gcc4 can be found or not.

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What have you tried ? Show us the relevant section of your Makefile. –  High Performance Mark Jan 29 '13 at 9:30
    
@HighPerformanceMark I don't have much experience with the more complicated parts of makefiles, so I just searched around and couldn't find anything that really fit. I did try amongst lots of other things $(shell which gcc4) but that failed because checking for the return value was executed in different shells - seeing the solution now makes that obvious but back then it was just another failed attempt. –  Voo Jan 29 '13 at 22:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As a quick hack you could add a simple shell based check for a gcc4 bin inside your makefile. For example:

CC := $(shell gcc4 -dumpversion >/dev/null 2>&1; if [ "$$?" -eq 0 ]; then echo "gcc4"; else echo "gcc"; fi)
<...>
$(CC) -c myprogram.c -o myprogram.o
<...>

However, for more mature projects I would recommend consider tools designed for such task in mind (autoconf).

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I was playing around with $(shell which gcc4) but couldn't figure out how to get the return code (the code apparently got executed in different shells), works perfectly. I'll look into autoconf, but since the only difference is how to invoke the compiler for now the easy solution works fine. –  Voo Jan 29 '13 at 22:16

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