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I currently have a problem when editing my manuscript.tex files. So far I have always used the text short-hand $$; however, something comes up and it requires me to replace all $...$ by \( \).

I think "sed" with replacement operation should be a right tool for the task. However, I am not good or familiar with "sed" and regular expression. Therefore, I need hints and helps for doing this.

Supposed the input file is named as manuscript.tex. I need "sed" to replace $ e=mc^2 $ with \( e=mc^2 \). How can I do this ?

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

If there is never a newline between the dollar signs, you can try something like

sed -e 's/\$\([^$]\+\)\$/\\(\1\\)/g' manuscript.tex > manuscript2.tex
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Hi @choroba, thanks for the correct solution. Just try to explain what I understand about your line of regular expression, please correct me if I am wrong. The pattern for sed replacement is 's/pattern1/pattern2/g'. Pattern 1 here is \$([^$]\+)\$ and pattern 2 is \(\1\). In patter 1, there are two \$ for open and close math environment in latex; [^$]\+ is for capturing from the begin to the end of strings between \$. In pattern 2, \( and \) are two replacements. What I don't understand are ( ) parts in the pattern 1 and \1 in the pattern 2. Why do you need those symbols ? – lengoanhcat Jan 29 '13 at 11:16
    
@user24265: The \(...\) remebers the substring to be later inserted with \1. Generally, \n corresponds to the n-th capturing \(. – choroba Jan 29 '13 at 11:23

Other way using sed

sed -re 's/(.*)\$(.*)\$(.*)/\\(\2\\)/g' temp.txt

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