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I'm looking for a std container like a std::list that can efficiently move an element to the front:

a-b-c-d-e

move "b" to front:

a-c-d-e-b

There is no such function in the std containers. Therefor, I think I must combine a remove and push_front function but has anyone can find a better idea?

Thank in advance.

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What does "efficiently" mean? –  Jon Jan 29 '13 at 9:51
    
goode question ... I mean better than removing it and creating it at the front. If I had to implement it from scratch (in C), I could simply make a.next point to "c", c.prev point to "a", b.prev point to "e", b.next point to NULL, front point to "b" and e.next point to "b"... that would be efficient; but re-implementing a container is a little bit too time consuming ;) –  Jav Jan 29 '13 at 10:01
    
The "fast" list solution is changing lots of pointers (8 bytes each in 64-bit code) at random postions in potentially uncached memory. A vector of five elements (like in the example) will possibly fit in a single cache line and be very fast. –  Bo Persson Jan 29 '13 at 10:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you don't have to maintain the order of the other elements, then the simplest solution is doubtlessly just to swap the element you want with the first element in the container. This will be efficient with all containers.

Otherwise, std::list offers a splice operation which could be used. Something like the following, I think:

void
moveToFront( 
    std::list<MyType>& list,
    std::list<MyType>::iterator element )
{
    if ( element != list.begin() ) {
        list.splice( list.begin(), list, element, std::next( element ) );
    }
}

This should end up with only a couple of pointer operations, and no copies. On the other hand, std::list can be very slow in general (because of its poor locality); I'd measure very carefully against the naïve implementation using std::vector, to make sure it was a win globally. Eliminating all copies here may not be a win if iterating to find the element you want to move to the front is ten time more expensive. (A lot of this depends on how expensive MyType is to copy, and how large it is. If sizeof(MyType) is close to the size of a page, or accessing MyType ends up accessing a lot of indirectly allocated objects, the locality argument won't hold.)

With an std::vector, rather than the obvious erase/insert

void
moveToFront( 
    std::vector<MyType>& list,
    std::vector<MyType>::iterator element )
{
    MyType tmp( *element );
    std::copy_backwards( list.begin(), std::prev( element ), element );
    *list.begin() = tmp;
}

This will result in less copies than the erase (which copies all of the following elements) insert (which also copies all of the following elements—which means all of the elements, because we are inserting at the beginning) pattern.

share|improve this answer

On std::vector, you could use std::rotate, which has linear complexity

#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>
#include <iterator>
#include <vector>

std::vector<int> v = { 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 };

int main()
{
   std::copy(v.begin(), v.end(), std::ostream_iterator<int>(std::cout, ",")); 
   std::cout << "\n";

   // swap ranges [1, 2) and [2, 5)
   auto it = std::next(v.begin(), 1); // O(1)
   auto rb = std::next(it);
   auto re = v.end();
   std::rotate(it, rb, re); // O(N)

   std::copy(v.begin(), v.end(), std::ostream_iterator<int>(std::cout, ","));   
   std::cout << "\n";
}

On a std::list you could use the member function splice, which (given iterators) has constant complexity

#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>
#include <iterator>
#include <list>

std::list<int> v = { 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 };

int main()
{
   std::copy(v.begin(), v.end(), std::ostream_iterator<int>(std::cout, ",")); 
   std::cout << "\n";

   auto it = std::next(v.begin(), 1); // O(N)
   auto rb = std::next(it);
   auto re = v.end();   
   v.splice(it, v, rb, re); // O(1)

   std::copy(v.begin(), v.end(), std::ostream_iterator<int>(std::cout, ","));
   std::cout << "\n";   
}

NOTE: the last element is conventially denoted as back in the STL containers, and the first element as front. For std::vector, getting iterators to a certain element is constant time, and swapping is linear time. For std::list, getting iterators is linear time, but splicing into the same list is constant time. However, the much better memory caching behavior of vector is also important as this benchmark by Stroustrup shows.

UPDATE: Several commenters mentioned simply swapping elements: this only applies if you want to transform a-b-c-d-e into a-e-c-d-b. In that case, use std::iter_swap on any container you like. For the transformation of a-b-c-d-e into a-c-d-e-b, use std::rotate or list::splice.

share|improve this answer
    
Using std::list and a remove-and-push operation would have constant complexity... –  Michael Wild Jan 29 '13 at 10:05
1  
Is that more efficient then a remove and insert of a single element? –  Lieuwe Jan 29 '13 at 10:07
2  
@MichaelWild But with a constant factor so much higher that it would likely be slower. (Of course, this depends on the size of the container and the type being moved.) –  James Kanze Jan 29 '13 at 10:08
1  
Removing a link from a std::list and inserting it somewhere else is really very cheap. I would be very surprised if the std::vector implementation was faster except for pathological cases. –  Michael Wild Jan 29 '13 at 10:11
    
@MichaelWild tnx, see updated answer. Note also the presentation by Stroustrup which gives surprising results for doing inserts on a std::vector. –  TemplateRex Jan 29 '13 at 10:17

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