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I am trying to write a regular expression in java which will validate following format-

XXXXXXXX_YZZZZ

where

X – alphanumeric characters(8 characters)
Y - alpha character
Z - numeric characters

what I have tried for first part is - ^[a-zA-Z0-9 ]*$ but I am not getting how to go for second part.

Can any one tell me what will be the correct regex for required format ?

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8 Answers 8

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try this regular expression

^[a-zA-Z0-9]{8}[_][a-zA-Z][0-9]{4}$
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You forgot to specify the amount and the underscore I assume...

/^[a-z0-9]{8}_[a-z][0-9]{4}$/i
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1  
Don't forget ^$ –  Jan Dvorak Jan 29 '13 at 10:16
    
Yea, sorry. :) They're in now –  Florian Peschka Jan 29 '13 at 10:18
    
What does the ^ and $ do? –  Ash Burlaczenko Jan 29 '13 at 10:21
    
Ash Burlaczenko, ^ indicates starts with and $ indicates ends with –  Avinash Nair Jan 29 '13 at 10:24
    
it's not working for me for this input - isa12345_a1234 –  Vivek Jan 29 '13 at 11:13

Look at JavaDoc, then you can translate your requirements to:

"^\\p{Alnum}{8}_\\p{Alpha}\\p{Digit}{4}$"

It uses predefined character classes, like you listed in your question.

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thanks for this.. –  Vivek Jan 29 '13 at 10:34

How about this?

^[a-ZA-Z0-9]{8}\_[a-zA-Z][0-9]{4}$

You can also group the results:

^([a-ZA-Z0-9]{8})\_([a-zA-Z])([0-9]{4})$

so that you can address the X, Y and Z parts individually from the results.

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What's the need of escaping _? –  Naveed S Jan 29 '13 at 10:19
    
@NaveedS it's not needed –  Jan Dvorak Jan 29 '13 at 10:19
    
It's not really needed, no, but I like to escape literals because that makes the regex clearer (at least for me). –  Roy Dictus Jan 29 '13 at 10:20
    
But it would be better to avoid unwanted escaping. –  Naveed S Jan 29 '13 at 10:22

Try this regex:

^[A-Za-z\d]{8}_[A-Za-z]\d{4}$

Your regex matches zero or more alphanumeric characters and/or whitespaces.

This is a good place to learn regex : http://www.regular-expressions.info

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Try:

^[a-zA-Z0-9]{8}_[a-zA-Z][0-9]{4}$

Regexper is your friend here.

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^[a-zA-Z0-9]{8}_[a-zA-Z][0-9]{4}$
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In Java, you can use metacharacters to express regulars expressions :

    "8abba778_a2012".matches("^\\w{8}_[a-z]\\d{4}$"); 

[EDIT] : According @Jon Dvorak, I am correcting my answer. In fact, \w is too generous and also applies to the underscore character _. The correct answer :

     "8abba778_a2012".matches("^[a-zA-Z0-9]{8}_[a-z]\\d{4}$"); 
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2  
\\w is too generous –  Jan Dvorak Jan 29 '13 at 10:25
    
Well according to Javadoc, docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/util/regex/Pattern.html, \w is equivalent to [a-zA-Z_0-9]. I dont understant why? –  Dimitri Jan 29 '13 at 10:27
2  
\\w is too generous because it tolerates an underscore. –  Jan Dvorak Jan 29 '13 at 10:28
    
OK, I will correct my answer –  Dimitri Jan 29 '13 at 10:47
1  
Well, \w,\d,\s are called metacharacters generally. Or should I say predefined character classes in Java terms. –  Dimitri Jan 29 '13 at 10:54

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