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I have this simple class with those 2 enum fields, I'm trying to find one item of this object in a collection (List<T>) but the Contains methods doesn't works correctly

public class Calculator : IEqualityComparer<Calculator>
{
    public DashboardsComputationMode ComputationMode { get; set; }
    public Modes Mode { get; set; }

    public Calculator(DashboardsComputationMode dashboardsComputationMode, Modes mode)
    {
        ComputationMode = dashboardsComputationMode;
        Mode = mode;
    }

    public bool Equals(Calculator x, Calculator y)
    {
        return (x.ComputationMode.Equals(y.ComputationMode) && x.Mode.Equals(y.Mode));
    }

    public int GetHashCode(Calculator obj)
    {
        return obj.ComputationMode.GetHashCode() ^ obj.Mode.GetHashCode();
    }
}

public enum DashboardsComputationMode
{
    Weighted = 0,
    Aggregated = 1,
    PR = 2,
    CurrentValue = 3,
    EquivalentHours = 4,
    AggregatedCorrected = 5,
    PRCorrected = 6
}

public enum Modes
{
    InstantaneousMode = 0,
    DailyMode = 1,
    MonthlyMode = 2,
    YearlyMode = 5,
    Undefined = 4,
}

Why could be that this test doesn't works

[TestMethod]
public void TestMethod1()
{
  var list = new List<Calculator>()
  {
    new Calculator(DashboardsComputationMode.PR, Modes.DailyMode),
    new Calculator(DashboardsComputationMode.CurrentValue, Modes.YearlyMode),
    new Calculator(DashboardsComputationMode.PRCorrected, Modes.MonthlyMode)
  };

  var item = new Calculator(DashboardsComputationMode.CurrentValue, Modes.YearlyMode);
  Assert.IsTrue(list[1].Equals(item));
  Assert.IsTrue(list.Contains(item));
}

The first assert works fine

Assert.IsTrue(list[1].Equals(item)) 

but the second doesn't

Assert.IsTrue(list.Contains(item));
share|improve this question
    
I always assumed that list.Contains does a reference check, so you have to have the same instance, not just a match. There is an overload that will take an IEqualityComparer. –  Jon Egerton Jan 29 '13 at 10:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

List<T>.Contains determines equality by using the default equality comparer (the one returned by the EqualityComparer<T>.Default).

Here's the MSDN explanation on how EqualityComparer<T>.Default works:

The Default property checks whether type T implements the System.IEquatable interface and, if so, returns an EqualityComparer that uses that implementation. Otherwise, it returns an EqualityComparer that uses the overrides of Object.Equals and Object.GetHashCode provided by T.

In other words, your Calculator class should either implement the System.IEquatable (not the System.IEqualityComparer!) interface or override the Object.Equals and Object.GetHashCode methods.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks !! that works fine implementing IEquatable –  Pablo Rodríguez Jan 29 '13 at 10:57

You are not using IEqualityComparer<Calculator> in Equals and Contains both. EqualityComparer has a different significance. I corrected the code for you.

  public class CalculatorComparer : IEqualityComparer<Calculator>
{

    public bool Equals(Calculator x, Calculator y)
    {
        return (x.ComputationMode.Equals(y.ComputationMode) && x.Mode.Equals(y.Mode));
    }

    public int GetHashCode(Calculator obj)
    {
        return obj.ComputationMode.GetHashCode() ^ obj.Mode.GetHashCode();
    }
}
public class Calculator
{
    public DashboardsComputationMode ComputationMode { get; set; }
    public Modes Mode { get; set; }

    public Calculator(DashboardsComputationMode dashboardsComputationMode, Modes mode)
    {
        ComputationMode = dashboardsComputationMode;
        Mode = mode;
    }


    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        Calculator y = obj as Calculator;

        return (this.ComputationMode.Equals(y.ComputationMode) && this.Mode.Equals(y.Mode));
    }
}

public enum DashboardsComputationMode
{
    Weighted = 0,
    Aggregated = 1,
    PR = 2,
    CurrentValue = 3,
    EquivalentHours = 4,
    AggregatedCorrected = 5,
    PRCorrected = 6
}

public enum Modes
{
    InstantaneousMode = 0,
    DailyMode = 1,
    MonthlyMode = 2,
    YearlyMode = 5,
    Undefined = 4,
}

Now both should return true.

share|improve this answer
    
You need to check for null in the calculator.Equals method after attempting to cast the object obj, if it is null then return false. –  RobH Jan 29 '13 at 10:51
    
Thanks, it works if i write Equals method as you say, in fact, implementing IEquatable i don't need to create a CalculatorComparer –  Pablo Rodríguez Jan 29 '13 at 10:58
    
@RobH you are right. I miss that. i will add it. –  D J Jan 29 '13 at 11:05

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