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In Scala I need to do something like following code in Java does:

public class A {
  private String text;  
  public A(String text) {
    this.text = text;
  }
}

How can achieve that in Scala?

I know that I can use class A(text: String) { ... }, but this is only a very simplified example and not real case.

I have tried the following and it prints always null:

class A {
  var text: String = null
  def this(text: String) = {
    this()
    this.text = text
  }
  println(text)
}

Thanks for help.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

In Scala classes have only one main constructor, and it's exactly what you define like this: class A(text: String) { ... }. All other constructors should call it at first and then do their own stuff.

All expressions in the body of the class are treated as body of the main constructor. So println(text) in you case is in the body of the main constructor. You call this() in your def this(text: String) constructor at first, so println is executed and only then you initialize text field.


From my point of view, main constructor can satisfy most of the real-life use-cases (especially with default and named arguments). So can you please elaborate on this and explain why you need the second one? Maybe we can find beter solution for the problem you are facing there.


Update regarding the comment

If you want to provide a set of optional arguments during construction time, then I recommend you to use Option instead of null values. So you can implement your A class like this:

class A(val a: Option[String] = None, val b: Option[Int] = None, c: Option[Double] = Some(2.0)) 

new A(b = Some(10))

All fields are now constant and have some default, but you can customize some of them. It's also possible that some combination of arguments are mutually exclusive, according to some business logic, for example. In this case it's reasonable to use several constructors. But even better solution can be to create several factory methods in companion object of the class and make constructor private. For example, if users of the class are allowed to provide either a and b or c, then you can write something like this:

class A private (val a: Option[String] = None, val b: Option[Int] = None, c: Option[Double] = Some(2.0)) 

object A {
    def apply(a: String, b: Int) = new A(Some(a), Some(b))
    def apply(c: Double) = new A(c = Some(c))
}

A("test", 1)
A(11.1)
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for answer, I didn't know about fact, that all expressions in body of class are treated as if they were in constructor. And reason for which I asked the question was: I need to have multiple variables of various types in instance of class. I wanted to provide constructors for each allowed combination of them. Others would be null. Then in code I would be able to test if particular variable is null or has value and then do some action based on that. –  Jozo Panacik Jan 29 '13 at 12:16
    
@JozoPanacik Thanks for the explanation. I updated my answer –  tenshi Jan 29 '13 at 12:39
    
Thanks! that's what I needed. –  Jozo Panacik Jan 29 '13 at 13:15
    
It is certainly not true that "All expressions in the body of the class are treated as body of the main constructor"! Only those expressions that are the right-hand side of non-lazy vals and vars and those at the top-level (not method bodies) are part of the primary constructor. –  Randall Schulz Jan 29 '13 at 16:40
    
@RandallSchulz in my definition, I make a distinction between expression and statement. for example 1 + 1 and println("foo") are expressions, but val, var and method definitions are statements (they are part of the class structure and you can't actually call them expressions). Please refer en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Statement_(computer_science)#Expressions . –  tenshi Jan 29 '13 at 19:48
class A {
  var text: String = null
  def this(text: String) = {
    this()
    this.text = text
    println(text)
  }
}

or

class A(text:String=""){
  println(text)
}

or

class A(text:String=null){
  println(text)
}
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The correct way to do that is :

    class A( text : String) {
       def this() = this("") // or null
   }

As Tenshi said, the default constructor is the A(text : String) and all other constructors, for instance this() must call it first.

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