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I have a set of data (displacement vs time) which I have fitted to a couple of equations using the optimize.leastsq method. I am now looking to get error values on the fitted parameters. Looking through the documentation the matrix outputted is the jacobian matrix, and I must multiply this by the residual matrix to get my values. Unfortunately I am not a statistician so I am drowning somewhat in the terminology.

From what I understand all I need is the covariance matrix that goes with my fitted parameters, so I can square root the diagonal elements to get my standard error on the fitted parameters. I have a vague memory of reading that the covariance matrix is what is output from the optimize.leastsq method anyway. Is this correct? If not how would you go about getting the residual matrix to multiply the outputted Jacobian by to get my covariance matrix?

Any help would be greatly appreciated. I am very new to python and therefore apologise if the question turns out to be a basic one.

the fitting code is as follows:

fitfunc = lambda p, t: p[0]+p[1]*np.log(t-p[2])+ p[3]*t # Target function'

errfunc = lambda p, t, y: (fitfunc(p, t) - y)# Distance to the target function

p0 = [ 1,1,1,1] # Initial guess for the parameters


  out = optimize.leastsq(errfunc, p0[:], args=(t, disp,), full_output=1)

The args t and disp is and array of time and displcement values (basically just 2 columns of data). I have imported everything needed at the tope of the code. The fitted values and the matrix provided by the output is as follows:

[  7.53847074e-07   1.84931494e-08   3.25102795e+01  -3.28882437e-11]

[[  3.29326356e-01  -7.43957919e-02   8.02246944e+07   2.64522183e-04]
 [ -7.43957919e-02   1.70872763e-02  -1.76477289e+07  -6.35825520e-05]
 [  8.02246944e+07  -1.76477289e+07   2.51023348e+16   5.87705672e+04]
 [  2.64522183e-04  -6.35825520e-05   5.87705672e+04   2.70249488e-07]]

I suspect the fit is a little suspect anyway at the moment. This will be confirmed when I can get the errors out.

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Not entirely sure what your asking, perhaps some examples would be helpful. –  Sean McCully Jan 29 '13 at 11:43
    
That's the main docs I've been looking at. The code I have used has been added to the above description –  Phil Jan 29 '13 at 11:46
1  
I think I have found a way around it (albeit a little inconvenient in terms of rewriting code) I thing the 'optimise.curve_fit' outputs the covarience matrix, from which you can get your errors from, and it uses the same least squares regression method as the 'optimize.leastsq'. Can anybody confirm this is correct? –  Phil Jan 29 '13 at 13:55
    
Yes, curve_fit returns the covariance matrix for the parameter estimate (uncertainty). If you want to use leastsq directly, you can also check the source of curve_fit. –  user333700 Jan 30 '13 at 7:10

2 Answers 2

Getting the correct errors in the fit parameters can be subtle in most cases.

In general, you have data points and an associated uncertainty with each data point. For most measurements the uncertainty in each data point is a systematic uncertainty of the measuring device or procedure and so it is the same for all points (EQUAL ERRORS). However, in some cases the data points can have individual errorbars (INDIV. ERRORS).

If you use optimize.leastsq you are restricted to the case of EQUAL ERRORS. In this case the leastsq method gives you back the fractional covariance matrix, which you need to multiply by the residual variance (i.e. the reduced chi squared). Then, taking the square root of the diagonal elements will give you standard deviation of the fit parameters.

If you use optimize.curvefit, the first part of the above procedure (multiplying by the reduced chi squared) is performed inside the routine. So you only need to take the square root of the diagonal elements of the covariance matrix to get standard deviation of the fit parameters.

An additional benefit of optmize.curvefit is that it does not restrict you to the case with EQUAL ERRORS. You can specify INDIV. ERRORS by using the sigma option in optimize.curvefit.

There is however a big big pitfall in doing the errors in the ways mentioned above. As was pointed out nicely by HansHarhoff in his answer here

In Scipy how and why does curve_fit calculate the covariance of the parameter estimates

"[the] curve_fit result does not actually account for the absolute size of the errors, but only take into account the relative size of the sigmas provided. This means that the pcov returned doesn't change even if the errorbars change by a factor of a million. This is of course not right"

The best way to deal with errors of fit parameters is by using the bootstrap method. This method is outlined in

http://phe.rockefeller.edu/LogletLab/whitepaper/node17.html

Below I offer some code that compares the bootstrap methods with the covariance matrix method used in both leastsq and curve_fit. I define a function called fit_function that takes in some data and fits it to a line. It prints out a comparison of the various fitting methods.

from scipy import optimize

def line( x, p):
    return p[0]*x + p[1] 

def linef( x, p0, p1):
    return p0*x + p1


def fit_function(p0, datax, datay, function, **kwargs):

    errfunc = lambda p, x, y: function(x,p) - y

    ##################################################
    ## 1. COMPUTE THE FIT AND FIT ERRORS USING leastsq
    ##################################################

    # If using optimize.leastsq, the covariance returned is the 
    # reduced covariance or fractional covariance, as explained
    # here :
    # http://stackoverflow.com/questions/14854339/in-scipy-how-and-why-does-curve-fit-calculate-the-covariance-of-the-parameter-es
    # One can multiply it by the reduced chi squared, s_sq, as 
    # it is done in the more recenly implemented scipy.curve_fit
    # The errors in the parameters are then the square root of the 
    # diagonal elements.   
    pfit, pcov, infodict, errmsg, success = \
        optimize.leastsq( errfunc, p0, args=(datax, datay), \
                          full_output=1)

    if (len(datay) > len(p0)) and pcov is not None:
        s_sq = (errfunc(pfit, datax, datay)**2).sum()/(len(datay)-len(p0))
        pcov = pcov * s_sq
    else:
        pcov = inf

    error = [] 
    for i in range(len(pfit)):
        try:
          error.append( numpy.absolute(pcov[i][i])**0.5)
        except:
          error.append( 0.00 )
    pfit_leastsq = pfit
    perr_leastsq = numpy.array(error) 


    ###################################################
    ## 2. COMPUTE THE FIT AND FIT ERRORS USING curvefit
    ###################################################

    # When you have an error associated with each dataY point you can use 
    # scipy.curve_fit to give relative weights in the least-squares problem. 
    datayerrors = kwargs.get('datayerrors', None)
    curve_fit_function = kwargs.get('curve_fit_function', function)
    if datayerrors is None:
        pfit, pcov = \
            optimize.curve_fit(curve_fit_function,datax,datay,p0=p0)
    else:
        pfit, pcov = \
             optimize.curve_fit(curve_fit_function,datax,datay,p0=p0,\
                                sigma=datayerrors)
    error = [] 
    for i in range(len(pfit)):
        try:
          error.append( numpy.absolute(pcov[i][i])**0.5)
        except:
          error.append( 0.00 )
    pfit_curvefit = pfit
    perr_curvefit = numpy.array(error)  


    ####################################################
    ## 3. COMPUTE THE FIT AND FIT ERRORS USING bootstrap
    ####################################################        

    # An issue arises with scipy.curve_fit when errors in the y data points
    # are given.  Only the relative errors are used as weights, so the fit
    # parameter errors, determined from the covariance do not depended on the
    # magnitude of the errors in the individual data points.  This is clearly wrong. 
    # 
    # To circumvent this problem I have implemented a simple bootstraping 
    # routine that uses some Monte-Carlo to determine the errors in the fit
    # parameters.  This routines generates random datay points starting from
    # the given datay plus a random variation. 
    #
    # The random variation is determined from average standard deviation of y
    # points in the case where no errors in the y data points are avaiable.
    #
    # If errors in the y data points are available, then the random variation 
    # in each point is determined from its given error. 
    # 
    # A large number of random data sets are produced, each one of the is fitted
    # an in the end the variance of the large number of fit results is used as 
    # the error for the fit parameters. 

    # Estimate the confidence interval of the fitted parameter using
    # the bootstrap Monte-Carlo method
    # http://phe.rockefeller.edu/LogletLab/whitepaper/node17.html
    residuals = errfunc( pfit, datax, datay)
    s_res = numpy.std(residuals)
    ps = []
    # 100 random data sets are generated and fitted
    for i in range(100):
      if datayerrors is None:
          randomDelta = numpy.random.normal(0., s_res, len(datay))
          randomdataY = datay + randomDelta
      else:
          randomDelta =  numpy.array( [ \
                             numpy.random.normal(0., derr,1)[0] \
                             for derr in datayerrors ] ) 
          randomdataY = datay + randomDelta
      randomfit, randomcov = \
          optimize.leastsq( errfunc, p0, args=(datax, randomdataY),\
                            full_output=0)
      ps.append( randomfit ) 

    ps = numpy.array(ps)
    mean_pfit = numpy.mean(ps,0)
    Nsigma = 1. # 1sigma gets approximately the same as methods above
                # 1sigma corresponds to 68.3% confidence interval
                # 2sigma corresponds to 95.44% confidence interval
    err_pfit = Nsigma * numpy.std(ps,0) 

    pfit_bootstrap = mean_pfit
    perr_bootstrap = err_pfit


    # Print results 
    print "\nlestsq method :"
    print "pfit = ", pfit_leastsq
    print "perr = ", perr_leastsq
    print "\ncurvefit method :"
    print "pfit = ", pfit_curvefit
    print "perr = ", perr_curvefit
    print "\nbootstrap method :"
    print "pfit = ", pfit_bootstrap
    print "perr = ", perr_bootstrap

Here I generate some random data and use the function above to compare the estimation in the fit parameter errors:

# Lets look at how the methods defined above work for some simple linear data
# First look at the case when no errors are available for the y data points,
# for the data we will add a random spread with std_dev = 1.0

data_spread =1.0

# Generate random data 
datax = np.linspace( 0., 10, 20)
datay0 = line( datax, [1.5, 0.5 ]) 
datay = datay0 + numpy.random.normal(0., data_spread, len(datay0))

plot(datax, datay0,'.')
plot(datax, datay,'.')

fit_function( [1.,0.1], datax, datay, line, curve_fit_function=linef) 

The output of the code right above is as shown below. It is seen that all the methods agree in this case.

lestsq method :
pfit =  [ 1.39358739  1.31943474]
perr =  [ 0.06395102  0.374048  ]

curvefit method :
pfit =  [ 1.39358739  1.31943474]
perr =  [ 0.06395102  0.374048  ]

bootstrap method :
pfit =  [ 1.39261362  1.31500969]
perr =  [ 0.06256547  0.33161705]

fig1

Now we consider a more pathological case

# Now suppose that by some miracle all your measured points 
# happen to lie really close to the line, but you know that 
# the error associated with each of them is about 1.0 (std. dev) 
# You expect the same error in the fit parameters as above.

data_spread = 0.1
uncertainty_each_measurement = 1.0

# Generate random data 
datax = np.linspace( 0., 10, 20)
datay0 = line( datax, [1.5, 0.5 ]) 
datay = datay0 + numpy.random.normal(0., data_spread, len(datay0))

plot(datax, datay0,'.')
#plot(datax, datay,'.')
errorbar(datax, datay, yerr=np.ones_like(datay)*uncertainty_each_measurement)

fit_function( [1.,0.1], datax, datay, line, curve_fit_function=linef,   datayerrors=np.ones_like(datay0)*uncertainty_each_measurement) 

The output of this case is shown below:

lestsq method :
pfit =  [ 1.51029713  0.46513402]
perr =  [ 0.00756616  0.04425431]

curvefit method :
pfit =  [ 1.51029713  0.46513402]
perr =  [ 0.00756616  0.04425431]

bootstrap method :
pfit =  [ 1.50164205  0.50193031]
perr =  [ 0.06376916  0.40931604]

fig2

As can be seen, only the bootstrap method gets the error correctly. The other methods give you a much smaller error on the fit parameters. Now it is up to you decide which one you want to use...

share|improve this answer
    
So, let me see if I understand what you did. You generate random values around the supplied Y based on the supplied errors (or the residue) you do this 100 times, getting fit parameters at each steps. You then take the STD as the error? How is it compared with statsmodels' WLS? –  Yotam May 4 '14 at 19:45
    
Hi Yotam, I am not familiar with the WLS function in statsmodels. What I aim for is dealing with measurements that individually have a large error/uncertainy but whose means fit a model reasonably well. The goal is to provide a reasonable value of the error of the fit parameters. Even if the mean values lie perfectly on the fit line, if the error of each measurement is gigantic then the fit parameter error must reflect that. –  Pedro M Duarte May 9 '14 at 0:03
    
One way of doing this is the 'brute force' bootstrap method (which I showed here), another way would be to study the dependence of the error function (chi squared, $\chi^{2}$) on each fitted parameter and establishing a confidence interval for each parameter. Sometimes people use the known derivative of the error function with respect to the fitted parameter ( $\mathrm{d}\chi^{2} / \mathrm{d}p$ ) to quickly access this confidence interval, or they numerically vary the parameter with all other parameters held fixed and define a confidence interval based on the observed change of $\chi^{2}$ –  Pedro M Duarte May 9 '14 at 0:21

Found your question while trying to answer my own similar question. Short answer. The cov_x that leastsq outputs should be multiplied by the residual variance. i.e.

s_sq = (func(popt, args)**2).sum()/(len(ydata)-len(p0))
pcov = pcov * s_sq

as in curve_fit.py. This is because leastsq outputs the fractional covariance matrix. My big problem was that residual variance shows up as something else when googling it.

Residual variance is simply reduced chi square from your fit.

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