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How is it called when critical section is extended in subclass or caller function?

Suppose class A has synchronized methods m1 and m2

class A {
 public synchronized void m1() {}
 public synchronized void m2() {}
}

And class B extends A has method m3 which uses both m1 and m2 and is also synchronized

class B extends A {
 public synchronized void m3() { 
      ...
      m1();
      ...
      m2();
      ...
 }
}

This can be required if m3 wants to have state unchanged between calls to m1 and m2.

The question is about terminology.

What is it called?

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2 Answers 2

If there is a lock hierarchy on the flow of execution - the locks from the hierarchy are called nested locks. They can be re-entrant or non-reentrant.

If individual operations are thread-safe, m1() and m2() in this case, but sequences of operations where the control flow depends on the results of previous operations may be subject to data races - it's called conditional thread safety.

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I'm sure, there isn't special term for this situation. Furthermore, I can't see, where you are actually extend critical section in subclass.

I think, this is just called "invoking method of superclass inside new method in subclass". Nothing else. It is not about synchronization.

UPD:

actually, what you did, is such code:

class B extends A {
 public void m3() { 
      synchronized (this) {
      ...
      synchronized (this) {
          //m1();
          ... m1 source...
      } 
      ...
      synchronized (this) {
          //m2();
          ... m2 source...
      } 
      ...
      }
 }
}

what is absolutely equivalent to:

class B extends A {
 public void m3() { 
      synchronized (this) {
      ...
          //m1();
          ... m1 source...
      ...
          //m2();
          ... m2 source...
      ...
      }
 }
}

I.e. internal synchronization on the same object inside synchronized block on the same object - is unnecessary and meaningless thing.

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Sorry but this IS about synchronization. In superclass I have 2 small critical sections, while in subclass I have bigger one with smaller ones inside. I.e. thread is in critical section for a longer time. –  Suzan Cioc Jan 29 '13 at 11:19
    
@SuzanCioc I've updated my answer. May be it will be more clear, what I mean by my explanation. –  Andremoniy Jan 29 '13 at 11:25
    
@Andremoniy that's not true! One critical section is something entirely different than two smaller (even without code in between them, as in this example). –  Dariusz Jan 29 '13 at 12:06
    
@Andremoniy this depends on contract. Subclass can support finer grained critical sections than superclass or container. –  Suzan Cioc Jan 29 '13 at 12:18
    
SuzanCioc and @DariuszWawer if you what the super class critical sections to be independent of subclass critical sections, then you need to use different monitors. If you use the same monitor, you your example "this" then Andremoniy's statements do apply with the addition that calls to m1() and m2() will be blocked while some thread is running m3() –  hidralisk Jan 29 '13 at 18:21

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