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I have a function to disable interrupts, but the problem is that if I disable them and I call a function which also disables/enables them, they get re-enabled too early. Is the following logic enough to prevent this?

static volatile int IrqCounter = 0;

void EnableIRQ()
{
    if(IrqCounter > 0)
    {
        IrqCounter--;
    }

    if(IrqCounter == 0)
    {
        __enable_irq();
    }
}

void DisableIRQ()
{
    if(IrqCounter == 0)
    {
        __disable_irq();
    }

    IrqCounter++;
}
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Shouldn't it be the otherway round? When you enable, you really enable at 0 and increment the count for all other calls and when you disable, you decrement and when it becomes zero, then you call the real disable? –  Jay Jan 29 '13 at 12:03
    
@Jay When the MCU boots they are already enabled by default, so thats why my logic seems a bit weird –  Muis Jan 29 '13 at 12:08
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Assuming that you've got a system where you can't change context when interrupts are disabled, then what you've got is fine, assuming you keep careful track of when call the enable().

In the usage you're describing in the comments below, you plan on using these sections from within an interrupt service routine. Your main use is blocking higher-priority interrupts from running for a certain portion of an ISR.

Be aware that you'll have to consider the stack depth of these nested ISRs, as when you enable interrupts before your return from interrupt, you'll have interrupts enabled in the ISR.

Regarding other answers: the lack of thread-safety of the enable() (due to the if(IrqCounter > 0)) doesn't matter, because anytime you're in the enable() context switches are already disabled due to interrupts being off. (Unless for some reason you have unmatched disable/enable pairs, and in that case you've got other issues.)

The only suggestion I'd have would be to add an ASSERT to the enable instead of the run-time check, as you should never be enabling interrupts that you didn't disable.

void EnableIRQ()
{
  ASSERT(IrqCounter != 0)  //should never be 0, or we'd have an unmatched enable/disable pair

  IrqCounter--;  //doesn't matter that this isn't thread safe, as the enable is always called with interrupts disabled.

  if(IrqCounter == 0)
  {
      __enable_irq();
  }
}

I prefer the technique you've listed over the save(); disable(); restore(); technique as I don't like having to keep track of a piece of the OS' data every time I work with the interrupts. But, you do have to be aware of when you (directly or indirectly) make a call to the enable() from an ISR.

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You wrote "you can't ever call these from an ISR", but I actually planned on doing that. I want to call this function from within an ISR, to prevent any other (higher-priority) ISR's pre-empt this (lower-priority) ISR. Would there be a problem with that? –  Muis Jan 29 '13 at 17:11
    
As long as you're doing the enable() as the absolute last call in the ISR, the calls themselves would be ok. However you may end up with deeper than expected call stack as your ISR may not unroll before you go service the now-enabled higher-priority interrupt. –  Ross Jan 29 '13 at 18:01
    
Im trying to understand why it should be the last call. I understand that I need twice the stack-space when the enable-call causing an pending (higher-priority) interrupt to execute. But isnt this always the case? Even without disabling/enabling interrupts isnt there always the chance that I would get pre-empted by another interrupt in that function? –  Muis Jan 29 '13 at 18:27
    
I had assumed the reason for the disables was to ensure nothing else would execute during the ISR. But it looks like your usage is to ensure that nothing else executes during a portion of your ISR. I'll update my answer to reflect your usage more... –  Ross Jan 29 '13 at 19:54
    
Exactly! My interrupts are thread-safe but very small portions are not. So I briefly disable interrupts, execute the unsafe code, and re-enable them ASAP. For example, when I call malloc() from the ISR, i need to surround it with disable/enable, because malloc() is not thread-safe in my environment. –  Muis Jan 29 '13 at 20:03
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The way every operating system I know of does it is to save IRQ state into a local variable, and then restore that.

Clearly, your code has TOCTOU issues - if two threads run at the same time, checking the IrqCounter > 0, if IrqCounter == 1, then the first thread will see it as 1, the second thread sees it as 1, and both decrement the counter.

I would definitely try to arrange something like this:

int irq_state = irq_save();

irq_disable();

... do stuff with IRQ's turned off ... 

irq_restore(irq_state);

Now, you don't have to worry about counters that can get out of sync, etc.

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But, when the code is running in EnableIRQ() doing the check for > 0, there's no possibility of 2 threads running at the same time. (Because interrupts are disabled, thus so are context switches...) Unless for some reason you're reenabling something you didn't disable, but the you've got other problems. –  Ross Jan 29 '13 at 14:18
    
@Mats The whole reason for creating these wrappers in the first place is that I dont know how I can read out the current state. It's a Cortex M0 CPU and I know the assembly instruction to disable IRQ's ("CPSID") but I cant figure out how to check the current state. –  Muis Jan 29 '13 at 17:15
    
It's an ARM processor, yes? If so, you can use MSR and MRS to read/write the PRIMASK register. –  Mats Petersson Jan 29 '13 at 17:19
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That looks fine, except it's not thread-safe.

Another common option is to query the interrupt-enable/disable state and save it into a local variable, then disable interrupts, then do whatever you want to be done while interrupts are disabled, then restore the state from the local variable.

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