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I am new to Go and trying to figure out how it manages memory consumption.

I have trouble with memory in one of my test projects. I don't understand why Go uses more and more memory (never freeing it) when my program runs for a long time.

I am running the test case provided below. After the first allocation, program uses nearly 350 MB of memory (according to ActivityMonitor). Then I try to free it and ActivityMonitor shows that memory consumption doubles. Why?

I am running this code on OS X using Go 1.0.3.

What is wrong with this code? And what is the right way to manage large variables in Go programs?

I had another memory-management-related problem when implementing an algorithm that uses a lot of time and memory; after running it for some time it throws an "out of memory" exception.

package main

import ("fmt" 
"time"
)

func main() {
  fmt.Println("getting memory")
  tmp := make([]uint32, 100000000)
  for kk, _ := range tmp {
    tmp[kk] = 0
  }
  time.Sleep(5 * time.Second)
  fmt.Println("returning memory")
  tmp = make([]uint32, 1)
  tmp = nil
  time.Sleep(5 * time.Second)
  fmt.Println("getting memory")
  tmp = make([]uint32, 100000000)
  for kk, _ := range tmp {
    tmp[kk] = 0
  }
  time.Sleep(5 * time.Second)
  fmt.Println("returning memory")
  tmp = make([]uint32, 1)
  tmp = nil
  time.Sleep(5 * time.Second)  
  return
}
share|improve this question
1  
Here's a link to some good article about memory management in Go: lwn.net/Articles/428100 – OlliP Jan 30 '13 at 14:28
1  
"I am running this code on OSx, go1.0.3." If you need to do something memory intensive using Go tip (what will become 1.1) is highly recommended. I was leery at first, but after a couple of the Go developers recommended it, it as been more stable than 1.0.3 for me, esp. in regards to memory use. – voidlogic Feb 2 '13 at 6:21
up vote 34 down vote accepted

Currently, go uses a mark-and-sweep garbage collector, which in general does not define when the object is thrown away.

However, if you look closely, there is a go routine called runtime·MHeap_Scavenger which essentially runs as long as your program does and calls the GC periodically:

// If we go two minutes without a garbage collection, force one to run.
forcegc = 2*60*1e9;
// If a span goes unused for 5 minutes after a garbage collection,
// we hand it back to the operating system.
limit = 5*60*1e9;

forcegc determines the period after which the gc is called by force. limit determines when spans are returned to the operating system. Spans are a number of memory pages which can hold several objects. They're kept for limit time and are freed if no object is on them and limit is exceeded.

Further down in the code you can see that there is a trace option. You can use this to see, whenever the scavenger thinks he needs to clean up:

$ GOGCTRACE=1 go run gc.go
gc1(1): 0+0+0 ms 0 -> 0 MB 423 -> 350 (424-74) objects 0 handoff
gc2(1): 0+0+0 ms 1 -> 0 MB 2664 -> 1437 (2880-1443) objects 0 handoff
gc3(1): 0+0+0 ms 1 -> 0 MB 4117 -> 2213 (5712-3499) objects 0 handoff
gc4(1): 0+0+0 ms 2 -> 1 MB 3128 -> 2257 (6761-4504) objects 0 handoff
gc5(1): 0+0+0 ms 2 -> 0 MB 8892 -> 2531 (13734-11203) objects 0 handoff
gc6(1): 0+0+0 ms 1 -> 1 MB 8715 -> 2689 (20173-17484) objects 0 handoff
gc7(1): 0+0+0 ms 2 -> 1 MB 5231 -> 2406 (22878-20472) objects 0 handoff
gc1(1): 0+0+0 ms 0 -> 0 MB 172 -> 137 (173-36) objects 0 handoff
getting memory
gc2(1): 0+0+0 ms 381 -> 381 MB 203 -> 202 (248-46) objects 0 handoff
returning memory
getting memory
returning memory

As you can see, no gc invoke is done between getting and returning. However, if you change the delay from 5 seconds to 3 minutes (more than the 2 minutes from forcegc), the objects are removed by the gc:

returning memory
scvg0: inuse: 1, idle: 1, sys: 3, released: 0, consumed: 3 (MB)
scvg0: inuse: 381, idle: 0, sys: 382, released: 0, consumed: 382 (MB)
scvg1: inuse: 1, idle: 1, sys: 3, released: 0, consumed: 3 (MB)
scvg1: inuse: 381, idle: 0, sys: 382, released: 0, consumed: 382 (MB)
gc9(1): 1+0+0 ms 1 -> 1 MB 4485 -> 2562 (26531-23969) objects 0 handoff
gc10(1): 1+0+0 ms 1 -> 1 MB 2563 -> 2561 (26532-23971) objects 0 handoff
scvg2: GC forced // forcegc (2 minutes) exceeded
scvg2: inuse: 1, idle: 1, sys: 3, released: 0, consumed: 3 (MB)
gc3(1): 0+0+0 ms 381 -> 381 MB 206 -> 206 (252-46) objects 0 handoff
scvg2: GC forced
scvg2: inuse: 381, idle: 0, sys: 382, released: 0, consumed: 382 (MB)
getting memory

The memory is still not freed, but the GC marked the memory region as unused. Freeing will begin when the used span is unused and older than limit. From scavenger code:

if(s->unusedsince != 0 && (now - s->unusedsince) > limit) {
    // ...
    runtime·SysUnused((void*)(s->start << PageShift), s->npages << PageShift);
}

This behavior may of course change over time, but I hope you now get a bit of a feel when objects are thrown away by force and when not.

As pointed out by zupa, releasing objects may not return the memory to the operating system, so on certain systems you may not see a change in memory usage. This seems to be the case for Plan 9 and Windows according to this thread on golang-nuts.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you for explanation, as I understood, GC is not very complete now – duganets Jan 30 '13 at 10:44
    
I have written program which uses a lot of memory, while running with go1.0.3 on OSX program did panic at the middle of the computations after next attempt to alloc more memory (near 1.5Gb). I have optimised heavily to reuse as much objects and structures as I can, but still had memory exception. Then I cloned last release of go and had build it from source. By running with latest version of go my code consumes as much memory as it needs (2.2Gb) and finishes computations successfully. – duganets Jan 30 '13 at 10:50
    
I think I ran into this kind of issue code.google.com/p/go/issues/… – duganets Jan 30 '13 at 11:19
    
Glad it worked with tip. The GC seems to be quite incomplete, yes. If you're interested, you can look at the scanblock function of the GC to see, how it finds references. – nemo Jan 30 '13 at 12:41
3  
On Windows as of Go 1.1, garbage collected memory is NOT returned to the OS. Man that cost me a day to hunt down. groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/golang-nuts/vfmd6zaRQVs – zupa Oct 1 '13 at 22:45

To eventually (force) collect unused memory you must call runtime.GC().

variable = nil may make things unreachable and thus eligible for collection, but it per se doesn't free anything.

share|improve this answer
3  
This is no longer correct, you have to use FreeOSMemory to return the memory to the OS. – OneOfOne Sep 23 '14 at 17:18
    
@OneOfOne any idea why runtime.GC() does not work anymore? FreeOSMemory calls freeOSMemory which is Implemented in package runtime, what does that mean? – paradite Oct 5 '15 at 3:14

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