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Ex. Lets consider, I have a list,

list_var = ['sales_qty' , 'returns_qty' , 'net_sales_qty' , 'sales_amt' , 'returns_amt' ,'product_discount_amt' , 'product_net_amt' ,'product_cost_amt' , 'gross_sales_amt' , 'supplier_disc_amt' , 'category_disc_amt' , 'topup_disc_amt' , 'value_at_cost']

from this list element, i want to init these elements as list in the memory, so i could use append, extend method for these elements.

As follow,

#Need these variable in memory..
sales_qty = [], returns_qty  = [], net_sales_qty = [] ... value_at_cost = []

#list operation on variable..
sales_qty.append(5)

Is there any simple way to do that, so i could remove element or add element in list easily?

share|improve this question
    
What exactly is sales_qty in list_var = [sales_qty, ...]? A reference to some object? –  NPE Jan 29 '13 at 12:16
1  
@NPE: this is string element in the list, for which i need to define as list. –  Niks Jan 29 '13 at 12:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You could create a dictionary of lists based on list_var .

list_var = ['sales_qty' , 'returns_qty' , 'net_sales_qty' , 'sales_amt' , 'returns_amt' ,'product_discount_amt' , 'product_net_amt' ,'product_cost_amt' , 'gross_sales_amt' , 'supplier_disc_amt' , 'category_disc_amt' , 'topup_disc_amt' , 'value_at_cost']

list_dic = {k: [] for k in list_var}

Now can access your lists through the list_dic dict:

list_dic['sales_qty'].append(123)
list_dic['category_disc_amt'].append('abc')

If you're using a python version that does not support dict comprehensions (python 2.6 or lower), you can use a list comprehension instead (as DSM explained in his comment):

list_dic = dict((k, []) for k in list_var)
share|improve this answer
    
ok, dict init is more pythonic, I'll give you that :) –  isedev Jan 29 '13 at 12:26
    
{k: [] for k in list_var} this dict format not supported for python2.5 :( –  Niks Jan 29 '13 at 12:34
1  
@Niks: then you can use dict((k, []) for k in list_var) instead. This is still the right approach. –  DSM Jan 29 '13 at 12:35
    
@DSM I added your code to my answer. –  sloth Jan 29 '13 at 12:38

Use vars if you are invoking from global scope. Otherwise, use globals.

list_var = ['sales_qty' , 'returns_qty' , 'net_sales_qty' , 'sales_amt' , 'returns_amt' ,'product_discount_amt' , 'product_net_amt' ,'product_cost_amt' , 'gross_sales_amt' , 'supplier_disc_amt' , 'category_disc_amt' , 'topup_disc_amt' , 'value_at_cost']

for item in list_var:
    vars()[item] = []

sales_qty.append(1)
sales_qty.append(3)
returns_qty.append(2)

print "Outside..."
print sales_qty
print returns_qty


def foo():
    global sales_qty

    sales_qty.append(4)

    print "Inside foo..."
    print sales_qty
    print returns_qty

    # This works if you want the whole thing inside a function
    print "Variable from inside foo..."
    globals()["new_var"] = []
    new_var.append(5)
    print new_var

foo()

print "Outside again..."
print sales_qty
print returns_qty

Output:

>>> 
Outside...
[1, 3]
[2]
Inside foo...
[1, 3, 4]
[2]
Variable from inside foo...
[5]
Outside again...
[1, 3, 4]
[2]
>>> 
share|improve this answer
1  
Are these init as local var or global var in the memory?? –  Niks Jan 29 '13 at 12:34
    
They will be local to the scope in which vars() is invoked. –  ATOzTOA Jan 29 '13 at 12:36
2  
Now try this from within a function. As your link says: "Note, the locals dictionary is only useful for reads since updates to the locals dictionary are ignored." It only works by fluke in your test because you're working at module level. –  DSM Jan 29 '13 at 12:40
2  
Even if this would work, I don't see the point in creating variables dynamically. If you want to access them in your script, you need to know the name in advance, in which case you could just create them like any other ordinary variable: sales_qty = [] –  sloth Jan 29 '13 at 12:52
1  
Yes, globals() will work -- and for that matter, using "exec" would work in local scope if you absolutely, positively, wanted to create local variables dynamically. [Why, I've no idea.] But now you not only have the problem that @DominicKexel pointed out, you're polluting the global scope. That's deeply unpythonic. –  DSM Jan 29 '13 at 14:42

You mean something like this:

list_var = [ 'abc', 'cde', 'fgh' ]

dict_var = dict()
for x in list_var:
    dict_var[x] = []

dict_var['abc'].append(5)
share|improve this answer
    
Take note that your vars variable hides the builtin function vars. Nevertheless it can still be called as __builtins__.vars. –  Cristian Ciupitu Jan 29 '13 at 13:41
    
@Cristian: good point. Will update. –  isedev Jan 29 '13 at 16:58

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