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I have tried to make an MVC news system. I started by the use a pluralsight tutorial which was used to create a department with employees. I changed the idea to fit my own purposes, changing the departments to "category" and employees to "newspost". This all works out fine, but now I want to remove the categories, since I don't need categories for my news system. But I can't add to the database using entityframework when I do this.

I have an interface for the datasource that looks like this:

INewMvcSiteDataSource

public interface INewMvcSiteDataSource
{
    IQueryable<NewsPost> NewsPosts { get; }

    void Save();
}

This is inherited by my DB Context class:

NewMvcSiteDb

public class NewsMvcSiteDb : DbContext, INewMvcSiteDataSource
{
    public NewsMvcSiteDb() : base("DefaultConnection")
    {
    }

    public DbSet<NewsPost> NewsPosts { get; set; }

    IQueryable<NewsPost> INewMvcSiteDataSource.NewsPosts
    {
        get { return NewsPosts; }
    }

    public void Save()
    {
        SaveChanges();
    }
}

I then want to use it in the controller to add a newspost to the database:

NewsController

var newsPost = new NewsPost()
                    {
                        Subject = newsModel.Subject,
                        Content = newsModel.Content,
                        ImagePath = newsModel.ImagePath
                    };
_db.NewsPosts.Add(newsPost);
_db.Save();

But this is where the ADD fails with the message: 'System.Linq.IQueryable' does not contain a definition for 'Add' and no extension method 'Add' accepting a first argument of type 'System.Linq.IQueryable' could be found (are you missing a using directive or an assembly reference?)

Now as the error says, its caused by using IQueryable, but I have no idea how else to do it.

Can you guys help?

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
Is there a reason the interface has to expose IQueryable<NewsPost> instead of an type that allows adds? –  Joe Jan 29 '13 at 12:36
    
No it was how the pluralsight tutorial had done it. I figured I needed to change the type, but which types allow add? Thats what I can't figure out? –  Daniel Olsen Jan 29 '13 at 12:42
    
@Xenoxsis Change the type to IEnumerable –  mattytommo Jan 29 '13 at 13:23

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you don't mind exposing DbSet via your interface (some people don't like the ORM bleeding into the application),you should be able to do the following:

public interface INewMvcSiteDataSource
{
    DbSet<NewsPost> NewsPosts { get; }

    void Save();
} 



public class NewsMvcSiteDb : DbContext, INewMvcSiteDataSource
{
    public NewsMvcSiteDb() : base("DefaultConnection")
    {
    }

    public DbSet<NewsPost> NewsPosts { get; set; }

    public void Save()
    {
        SaveChanges();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
That did it - But say...for the sake of argument...That I did not want to expose DbSet. I like to keep things cleanly separated. Do you know a way around this? –  Daniel Olsen Jan 29 '13 at 13:08
    
Generally you'd end up adding a layer of abstraction. For example you may end up with a NewsItemRepository that would internally know about Entity Framwewok but would shield the rest of your application from those details. –  Joe Jan 29 '13 at 13:17
    
If it is not asking too much, you construct me an example of a NewsItemRepository class that does how you say? Cause I see what you're saying but how to actually build the thing is beyond me just now. –  Daniel Olsen Jan 29 '13 at 13:30
    
Sure -- a really naive implementation would be paste.ubuntu.com/1585959 –  Joe Jan 29 '13 at 14:04
    
Thank you very much, now last question. You say its a naive implementation. What makes it naive? Just so that if it might be the incorrect way of implementing I'd wanna know about it :) Thank you for all your help though –  Daniel Olsen Jan 29 '13 at 14:07

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