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jQuery uses $ (dollarsign), is there a standard sign one can use for my own custom library? So that anyone would understand it's custom?

Sometimes I only need to getEmementById and class, and be able to addclass and maybe a few more simple things. And I would like to do it like $('#someId').addClass('foo'); but I would like for others who view the code, and myself, to understand that it is a custom library, not jQuery. So, is there a standard sign for this?

EDIT: I could use a namespace, but thats not as pretty as a single sign. And I cant see why there isn't one out there allready that has been used by many before for this purpose. Isn't there one?

share|improve this question
1  
No... You can use _, though. – Jeremy Jan 29 '13 at 13:03
4  
Use a namespace. – Alexander Jan 29 '13 at 13:03
    
_ looks ugly, and namespaces consists of more than one sign(?) – Spoeken Jan 29 '13 at 13:05
2  
@Nile underscore already uses this @ Mathias what is your problem with using one or two letters for your namespace? – Christoph Jan 29 '13 at 13:06
1  
No.. you can use any and it does not need to be a sign. It may be a shortname, abbreviation or whatever as long as it's a valid variable name. – Joseph the Dreamer Jan 29 '13 at 13:06
up vote 1 down vote accepted

A function must have a valid variable name. Therefore, according to the spec a variable names can start with $, _, lower case/upper case unicode etc.

It's probably best to use the module pattern inconjunction with IIFE though.

IE if your library was assigned to a variable 'myLibrary'

var myLibrary = (function() {
  return {
     someFunction: function(){ ... };
  }
})()

And you could then pass it into an IIFE (Immediately invoked function expression) and give it your own variable - for instance using JQuery's $

(function($) { 
    $.someFunction();
})(myLibrary);

Because of the scope precedence of $ you'll have no problem doing this - Unless of course you want to make use of jQuery

share|improve this answer
    
I could of course create any namespace I want to. Or I could just use $, but a namespace isn't as pretty, and $ would confuse people. – Spoeken Jan 29 '13 at 13:16
1  
Then your alternative is a _ if you don't want to confuse people. Making use of the second pattern I gave is nice, as you can define your own variable to take precedence over anything else which may have been defined - IE if you use _ then you don't want to have conflictions with the underscore.js library – AlanFoster Jan 29 '13 at 13:18
    
Ok, so _ is the least confusing? But it will not work with underscore.js? – Spoeken Jan 29 '13 at 13:30
    
@Alan _ might confuse people as well (and lead to collisions), as it is the common usage for underscore.js - see my comment on the question. – Christoph Jan 29 '13 at 13:30
    
It looks like the answer to my question is NO! But this is the best one. – Spoeken Feb 1 '13 at 11:10

You could use the name of your library:

myLibrary('#someId').addClass('foo'); 

There will not be any confusion this way. Bear in mind that $ is just an alias to the jQuery function and youhave the possibility to redefine it in case you want to use it with other libraries.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I could. But a namespace isn't the same as a single sign. – Spoeken Jan 29 '13 at 13:17
    
You should at least have a namespace. Then if you want you could map it to a custom sign if you will. There's no established convention for that. – Darin Dimitrov Jan 29 '13 at 13:18
    
Yes, sure. But unfortunately that does not answer the question. I might have been unclear, so I updated the question. – Spoeken Jan 29 '13 at 13:20

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