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I know that maybe its a silly question but I have some troubles with it, Im ashamed but I really dont know, how to make it. I want to add and substract two 'hours' given as integers.

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <cmath>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    // should be: 21:59:2
    int rH, rM, rS;

    int h1 = 12, m1 = 34, s1 = 56;
    int h2 = 9, m2 = 24, s2 = 6;

    if(h1 + h2 >= 24)
    {
        rH = abs(h2 + h1);
        m1 += 60;

        if(m1 + m2 >= 60)
        {
            rH = (m2 - m1);
        }

    }
    else
    {
        rH = h1 + h2;
    }

    cout << rH << " " << rM << " " << rS << " " << "\n";

    return 0;
}

Tried the above but I dont know how to do it further. I cant use any date-time objects.

EDIT

substraction, I dont know where the error is but it calculates wrong:

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <cmath>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    int rH, rM, rS;
    int h1 = 12, m1 = 25, s1 = 29, h2 = 11, m2 = 12, s2 = 1;
    int sum1, sum2, sum;

    sum1 = (h1)*3600 + (m1)*60 + s1;
    sum2 = (h2)*3600 + (m2)*60 + s2;

    if(sum1 > sum2)
        sum = sum1-sum2;
    else
        sum = sum2-sum1;

    rS = sum %60;
    sum = sum/60;
    rM = sum % 60;
    rH = sum/60;

    std::cout << rH << " " << rM << " " << rS << " " << "\n";

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
2  
start from seconds... and keep the rest above 60 for minutes, and go on and on –  Zoka Jan 29 '13 at 13:15
    
it looks like you need to add two times rather than hours? –  Nim Jan 29 '13 at 13:15
    
@Philipp - it's C++, not Java... –  MrKWatkins Jan 29 '13 at 13:18
    
Most C applications treat times as UNIX timestamps (an integer which represents seconds since January 1st 1970). The type used for this is time_t. Using a single integer has the advantage that you can easily add and subtract them. There are also functions which convert it to a human-readable date: cplusplus.com/reference/ctime –  Philipp Jan 29 '13 at 13:31
    
@Philipp Just for the record, time_t does not have to be an integral type, neither in C nor in Unix. (I've never heard of an implementation where time_t isn't integral. But a lot of code I'm familiar with keeps times in a double, as a fraction of a day.) –  James Kanze Jan 29 '13 at 13:58

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted
// addition
int rH=0, rM=0, rS=0; 

rS = s1+s2;
if (rS>60)
{
    rM++;
    rS %= 60;
}

rM += m1+m2;
if (rM>60)
{
    rH++;
    rM %= 60;
}

rH += h1+h2;
if (rH>24)
{
    // 1 day more, who cares
    rH %= 24;
}

cout << rH << " " << rM << " " << rS << " " << "\n";

// substraction

int rH = 0, rM = 0, rS = 0; int h1 = 12, m1 = 25, s1 = 29, h2 = 11, m2 = 12, s2 = 1;

rS = s1 - s2;
if (rS<0)
{
    rM--;
    rS += 60;
}

rM += m1 - m2;
if (rM<0)
{
    rH--;
    rM += 60;
}

rH += h1 - h2;
if (rH<0)
{
    // Error occurred ...
}

cout << rH << " " << rM << " " << rS << " " << "\n";
share|improve this answer
    
thank you so much! How about substracion, maybe can you write it? –  Brian Brown Jan 29 '13 at 13:25
    
yea I can, can you? ;) –  duDE Jan 29 '13 at 13:26
1  
Ok, I will try, hold on a sec –  Brian Brown Jan 29 '13 at 13:26
    
Happy programming, you'll get it! –  duDE Jan 29 '13 at 13:27
1  
Shit in shit out ^^ –  duDE Jan 29 '13 at 13:28

Why not

int t1 = ((h1 * 60) + m1) * 60 + s1;
int t2 = ((h2 * 60) + m2) * 60 + s2;
int tdiff = t1 - t2;
if (tdiff < 0) { tdiff += 24 * 60 * 60;

Then use modular aritmetic and division to get the hours etc e.g.

int tdiffs = tdiff % 60;
tdiff  = tdiff / 60;
int tdiffm = tdiff % 60;
tdiff h = tdiff / 60; 
share|improve this answer

An approach could be (assuming you wanted to add the two times rather than simply the hour components) would be to:

  1. Convert the first time to total seconds (use the appropriate multiplier for each component, hours/minutes and seconds.)
  2. Convert the second time the same way
  3. Now add/subtract as necessary - this will give you a new time in seconds.
  4. If the new time is less tan 0, add a day's worth of seconds to it, if the new time is more than a day's worth of seconds, subtract
  5. The resulting value in seconds can then be decomposed to hours minutes and seconds via a reverse of what you did in step 1 (hint you'll need the modulo operator...)

EDIT: Oh why do I bother with trying to provide ideas rather than code, when folk (who clearly should know better) simply provide the code.... :(

share|improve this answer

you could either work in the lowest resolution for the calculation (seconds in you example) as Ed Heal shows.

or add starting with the Lest Significant Value and add the carry to the next value like that:

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <cmath>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    // should be: 21:59:2
    int rH(0), rM(0), rS(0);

    int h1 = 12, m1 = 34, s1 = 56;
    int h2 = 9, m2 = 24, s2 = 6;

    rS = s1 + s2;
    while (rS >= 60)
    {
        rS -= 60;
        rM++;
    }

    rM += m1 + m2;
    while (rM >= 60)
    {
        rM -= 60;
        rH++;
    }

    rH += h1 + h2;
    while (rH >= 24)
    {
        rS -= 24;
    }

    cout << rH << " " << rM << " " << rS << " " << "\n";

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

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