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I am a beginner with ANTLR, and I need to modify an existing - and complex - grammar.

I want to create a rule to keep a block without parsing with other rules. To be more clear, I need to insert a code wrote in c++ into the interpreted code.


Edit 11/02/2013

After many tests, here is my grammar, my test, the result I have, and the result and want:

Grammar

cppLiteral
    : cppBegin cppInnerTerm cppEnd
    ;
cppBegin
    :  '//$CPP_IN$'
    ;
cppEnd
    : '//$CPP_OUT$'
    ;
cppInnerTerm
    : ( ~('//$CPP_OUT$') )*
    ;

Test

//$CPP_IN$
txt1 txt2
//$CPP_OUT$

Result

cppLiteral ->
cppBegin = '//$CPP_IN$'
cppInnerTerm = 'txt1' 'txt2'
cppEnd = '//$CPP_OUT$'

Expected result

cppLiteral ->
cppBegin = '//$CPP_IN$'
cppInnerTerm = 'txt1 txt2'
cppEnd = '//$CPP_OUT$'

(Sorry, I can't post the image of the AST because I don't have 10 reputations)

The three tokens "cppBegin", "cppInnerTerm" and "cppEnd" can be in one token, like this:

cppLiteral
    : '//$CPP_IN$'( ~('//$CPP_OUT$') )*'//$CPP_OUT$'
    ;

to have this result:

cppLiteral = '//$CPP_IN$\n txt1 txt2\n //$CPP_OUT$'
share|improve this question
    
Your question is unclear to me. Do you want to ingore sequences surrounded by a $ character? Do you want to ignore a code block begining with a $CPP_INSERT_BEGIN$ token and ending with a $CPP_INSERT_END$ token? Do you want to perform a special behavior on the $ surrounded tokens or simply ignore them? –  greydet Jan 29 '13 at 13:52
    
I want to keep the block between $CPP_INSERT_BEGIN$ and $CPP_INSERT_END$. It's exactly the same thing than a string block: the part between the two " will not be modified (for example, in printf("something that is not a code")). Except that in my rule, the begin token and the end token aren't kept. –  Nagawica Jan 29 '13 at 14:32
    
In the few grammar rules you posted, I already see several errors ((1) parser rules cannot be fragments, (2) inside parser rules the ~ does not negate characters, but tokens, (3) you seem to confuse lexer- and parser rules). IMO, you're too unfamiliar with ANTLR to be able to do something like this. I recommend you start with some basics before continuing. –  Bart Kiers Jan 29 '13 at 16:00
    
You are right, I'm too unfamiliar with ANTLR! Thank you for the link, I have watched all the javadude's tutorial. It was very interesting, and learned me a lot of usefull things. I'm sure it will let me correct some strange things in my existing grammar. But I am still not able to do what I'm wanted to do :( (I edited my question to update it) –  Nagawica Feb 11 '13 at 15:24

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I want to create a rule to keep a block without parsing with other rules.

Parse it like a multiline comment, e.g. /* foobar */. Below is a small example using the keywords specified in your question.

Note that most of the work is done with lexer rules (those that start with a capital letter). Any time you want to deal with blocks of text, particularly if you want to avoid other rules as in this case, you're probably thinking in terms of lexer rules rather than parser rules.

CppBlock.g

grammar CppBlock;

document: CPP_LITERAL* EOF;


fragment CPP_IN:'//$CPP_IN$';
fragment CPP_OUT:'//$CPP_OUT$';

CPP_LITERAL:  CPP_IN .* CPP_OUT
            {
                String t = getText(); 
                t = t.substring(10, t.length() - 11); //10 = length of CPP_IN, 11 = length of CPP_OUT
                setText(t);
            }
            ;
WS: (' '|'\t'|'\f'|'\r'|'\n')+ {skip();};

Here is a simple test case:

Input

//$CPP_IN$
static const int x = 0; //magic number
int *y; //$CPP_IN$ <-- junk comment
static void foo(); //forward decl...
//$CPP_OUT$

//$CPP_IN$
//Here is another block of CPP code...
const char* msg = ":D";
//The end.
//$CPP_OUT$

Output Tokens

[CPP_LITERAL : 
static const int x = 0; //magic number
int *y; //$CPP_IN$ <-- junk comment
static void foo(); //forward decl...
]
[CPP_LITERAL : 
//Here is another block of CPP code...
const char* msg = ":D";
//The end.
] 

Rule CPP_LITERAL preserves newlines at the beginning and end of the input (after //$CPP_IN$ and before //$CPP_OUT$). If you don't want those, just update the action to strip them out. Otherwise, I think this grammar does what you're asking for.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much! It make exactly want I wanted! Like Bart Kiers said, I have still problems with Lexer and Parser. I have still a lot to learn, but this will be very helpful. Thank you again! –  Nagawica Feb 12 '13 at 8:27
    
@Nagawica Sure thing, I'm glad I could help. –  user1201210 Feb 12 '13 at 10:26

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