Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Suppose there's a common user page control that provides actions and is reused on majority of application pages. Common actions like: Save, Cancel, Reset, Send etc. It has about 10 of them at the moment.

Particular action state usually but not necessarily depends on the entity being displayed on the page and its state. In case of creating a new entity instance Save and Cancel could be displayed and enabled. But when we'd be editing an existing one Save, Cancel and Reset could be actively displayed actions.

Communication between actions common control and page

Since this common control with actions is state decoupled and isn't aware of page's context (or entity type and its state for that matter) I've decided to give it injection hooks so pages can provide action button getters that common control would then use.

Instead of having defined events and delegates I've decided to do a simplified type of a generally identical scenario. I've just used Func<bool> properties but they can easily be converted to events/delegates. Still this is how they're defined at the moment (example for Send action):

private Func<bool> DefaultState = () => false;

private Func<bool> isSendVisible;
public Func<bool> IsSendVisible
{
    private get { return isSendVisible ?? DefaultState; }
    set { isSendVisible = value; }
}

private Func<bool> isSendEnabled;
public Func<bool> IsSendEnabled
{
    private get { return isSendEnabled ?? DefaultState; }
    set { isSendEnabled = value; }
}

The thing is I've defined these couple of properties inside an interface:

public interface ISendActionProvider
{
    Func<bool> IsSendVisible { set; }
    Func<bool> IsSendEnabled { set; }
}

My common control implements this interface (and those of other actions as well), but other controls (even page itself) can provide the same interface so The same button can be displayed on several places and the same action state mechanism is reused. Page only has to binds its getters to providers during initialization so action providers can set actions' states appropriately.

The problem

The problem is that with every new action I have to add the same interface and implementation for it which results in quite a bit of semi-duplicated code.

It would be great if I could have a single interface and implement it for each action so it could be implemented several times by a single class (action provider class - in my case common control that provides these actions). The only way this could work in C# is by having a generic interface and then provide as many implementations as required. But I don't have differentiating generic types to provide multiple generic interface implementations.

public interface IActionProvider // multiple inplementations?
{
    Func<bool> IsActionVisible { set; }
    Func<bool> IsActionEnabled { set; }
}

The way that implementation works (as seen above) is every action has its default behaviour defined, but particular pages can override that by providing their own getters for particular action to provide their state.

Which possibilities do I have to consolidate my code?

What I would like to have is some sort of generic property providers that could be called as during initialization binding:

(provider as IActionProvider<TSend>).IsActionVisible<TSend> = this.IsSendVisible;

But as mentioned I don't have such differentiating generic types.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

One possible solution

Note: I'm answering this question myself with a possible solution that I don't really like but does what's required. I'm still waiting for better suggestions.

Instead of having several interfaces and their implementations, I could have only one with a bit different definition:

public interface IActionProvider
{
    void SetVisibleGetter(ActionType type, Func<bool> getter);
    void SetEnabledGetter(ActionType type, Func<bool> getter);
}

And implementation could then use some sort of a dictionary for individual action types:

private IDictionary<ActionType, Func<bool>> isActionVisible = new Dictionary<ActionType, Func<bool>> {
    { ActionType.Cacel, AlwaysFalse }
    { ActionType.Send, AlwaysFalse },
    ...
};

public void SetVisibleGetter(ActionType type, Func<bool> getter)
{
    this.isActionVisible[type] = getter ?? this.isActionVisible[type];
}

...

And then use it within action provider control that needs to set action's state like so:

linkSend.Visible = this.isActionVisible[ActionType.Send]();
share|improve this answer

You can provide a default implementation and use inheritance to override the default implementation.

E.G.

public class SubmitActionProvider:ActionProvider
{        
    public override Func<bool>  IsActionVisible
    {
         get 
         { 
            Console.WriteLine("submit");
                  return null;
         }
    }
}

public class CancelActionProvider : ActionProvider
{
    public override Func<bool> IsActionVisible
    {
        get
        {
            Console.WriteLine("cancel");
            return null;
        }
    }
}


public class ActionProvider
{
    public virtual Func<bool> IsActionVisible { get { Console.WriteLine("Default implementation"); return null; } }
    public virtual Func<bool> IsActionEnabled { set { } }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is a nice suggestion when all you think about is the class model and not actual control implementation. You see individual actions aren't really individual. They're everyday Asp.net link buttons or buttons. And they're contained within the (let's call it this way) CommonActions.ascx. And this particular control's codebehind class implements particular interface ISendActionProvider and other for other action links/buttons. My pages are merely communicating with the whole CommonActions control instead of individual actions on it. –  Robert Koritnik Jan 30 '13 at 8:33

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.