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I'm working on a Javascript module that looks like that.

var myApp = (function(){
    private function1();
    private function2()

    return {
    publicMethod1:function(){}
    publicMethod2:function(){}
    publicMethod3:function(){}
    }
})();
myApp.publicMethod3();

My module will maybe be used in a tag container, I'm not really sure about how that work but I'm afraid if for example, my module is executed in a global autoexecuted function, like this :

(function(){

var myApp = (function(){
    private function1();
    private function2()

    return {
    publicMethod1:function(){}
    publicMethod2:function(){}
    publicMethod3:function(){}
    }
})();
myApp.publicMethod3();
})();

I can't execute the methode of my module like I did before, my code won't work inside.

So what I'm asking? Do you know how work tag container? And, if the tag container includes my code in a global auto executed function, how could I change my module's code to make it working well inside. Thanks for your answers, and if is not clear to you, I'm gonna answer quickly to your questions.

share|improve this question
    
What do you mean by a "tag container?" –  Matt Ball Jan 29 '13 at 13:31
1  
Do not use swear words, it does nothing to help you. I removed it from the title. –  epascarello Jan 29 '13 at 13:32
    
"private" in JavaScript? –  epascarello Jan 29 '13 at 13:36
    
I think by "tag container" he means an IIFE, in which case there is no way to access even the exposed public methods from outside of the IIFE; that's what scope is for. –  jbabey Jan 29 '13 at 13:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You just had a bunch of syntax errors in your code, try this:

(function(){
    var myApp = (function(){
        var function1 = function(){};   // Fixed function declaration
        var function2 = function(){};

        return {
            publicMethod1:function(){}, // Added missing comma's
            publicMethod2:function(){},
            publicMethod3:function(){}
        }
    })();
    myApp.publicMethod3();
})();

There is no private keyword in JavaScript, and functions have to be declared as:

var name = function(){/* function body here */};

// or 
function name(){/* function body here */}

// or, when declared in objects:
var someObject = {
    name: function(){/* function body here */}
}

Also, items in objects are separated with a comma, like this:

var someObject = {
    property1: "value 1",
    property2: "value 2",
    property3: true,
    property4: 1234,
    property5: 1234   // Note: no comma after the last property.
}
share|improve this answer
    
You made stuff global by omitting the vars. –  epascarello Jan 29 '13 at 13:36
    
@epascarello: Whoops, fixed. –  Cerbrus Jan 29 '13 at 13:37
    
Sorry, I just posted a "look like" of my code, there are of course commas between my public methods :) –  M4nch4k Jan 29 '13 at 13:40
    
@M4nch4k: If you fix the syntax errors that were in the sample code, the sample code works just fine. I'd suggest you take a look at your own code, and see if there's similar issues in there. –  Cerbrus Jan 29 '13 at 13:43
    
Ok, I guess i saw where is the error in my code, I thought it was during the execution of myApp.method3(), but it is when I call a public method inside another public method. I never know if I need to use this.mypublicMethod(), or myApp.publicMethod(). –  M4nch4k Jan 29 '13 at 14:02

If you're afraid of your code no longer working when it is defined inside an IIFE, the only around it is to ensure that your module is a global property of the window object.

// append it to the window instead of using var
// this way it will always be global and not constrained to any wrapping scopes
window.myApp = (function(){
   ...
})();

Note that appending properties to the window objects can get really messy really quickly - try to stick with only doing this once and having all of your other code exposed under the myApp object.

share|improve this answer
    
Couldn't the reason it doesn't work any more be that he was polluting the global namespace? –  Cerbrus Jan 29 '13 at 13:46
    
@Cerbrus adding one variable can't be considered polluting - how else would you call into the code from external places if you don't expose one entry? –  jbabey Jan 29 '13 at 13:47
    
was polluting , I'm not disagreeing with your answer, just elaborating on it. –  Cerbrus Jan 29 '13 at 13:48
    
My goal with this code is avoiding to pollute the global namespace, you're right –  M4nch4k Jan 29 '13 at 14:00

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