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The following code :

<?php

    class Type {

    }

    function foo(Type $t) {

    }

    foo(null);

?>

failed at run time :

PHP Fatal error:  Argument 1 passed to foo() must not be null

Why it's not allowed to pass null just like other languages ?

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up vote 41 down vote accepted

You have to add a default value like

function foo(Type $t = null) {

}

in that way you can pass it a null value

The reason you can't pass a null is

Functions are now able to force parameters to be objects (by specifying the name of the class in the function prototype), interfaces, arrays (since PHP 5.1) or callable (since PHP 5.4).

[from php manual]

Infact you can note that you can't use a type hint for "natural" variables types like int,float,and so on

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3  
So why isn't null the null object? – Pacerier Jul 28 '13 at 16:06
    
@Pacerier: don't understand what you're asking me – DonCallisto Jul 28 '13 at 16:23
2  
Most languages allow null to have any type. In this scenario. – Henry Sep 4 '14 at 4:22
    
null is its own type. It's a primitive, not an object. Unlike the other primitives, PHP lets you use null in place of a hinted type. Note that with PHP, explicitly passing null to an argument that has a default value will cause it to use that default. – Michael Cordingley Jun 22 '15 at 17:18
1  
@MichaelCordingley: Explicitly passing null will cause that argument to be null (demo) – Jon Jun 23 '15 at 19:53

Try:

function foo(Type $t = null) {

}

Check out PHP function arguments.

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7  
The problem I have with this is that it changes the definition of the function. Now the parameter is optional - which isn't really what the author intended (although, if he is passing it null, it is implicitly optional). – crush Jan 29 '13 at 13:35

As other answers already mentioned, this is only possible if you specify null as the default value.

But the cleanest type-safe object oriented solution would be a NullObject:

interface FooInterface
{
    function bar();
}
class Foo implements FooInterface
{
    public function bar()
    {
        return 'i am an object';
    }
}
class NullFoo implements FooInterface
{
    public function bar()
    {
        return 'i am null (but you still can use my interface)';
    }
}

Usage:

function bar_my_foo(FooInterface $foo)
{
    if ($foo instanceof NullFoo) {
        // special handling of null values may go here
    }
    echo $foo->bar();
}

bar_my_foo(new NullFoo);
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