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there is a dictionary containning many lists, for example,

  list_dic= {
    q1:[1,2,3,4,5]
    q2:[2,3,5]
    q3:[2,5]
    }

and I want to get all common items count for each list, e.g. the common items count for q1 and q2 is 3=(2,3,5)

q1={q2:3, q3:2}
q2={q1:3,q3:2}
q3={q1:2, q2:2}

my code for this task is:

result = {}
for name, source_list in list_dic.items():
    for target_name, target_list in list_dic.items():
        count = 0
        for item in source_list:
            if item in target_list:
                count+=1
    result[name][target_name] = count 

but this algorithm is inefficient, I want to know a better algorithm to do this task

share|improve this question
    
does your lists contain unique numbers or not? if they do, how common items are counted in that case? –  VB9-UANIC Jan 29 '13 at 13:40
    
@VB9-UANIC: lists are compared in pairs. If two lists contained unique numbers (across both lists), the count of common numbers (common to both lists) would be zero, would it not? What's your point? –  isedev Jan 29 '13 at 13:42
    
my point not about uniq numbers across lists. is this ok or not? list_dic= { q1:[1,2,2,2,2] q2:[2,3,5] q3:[5,5] } –  VB9-UANIC Jan 29 '13 at 13:45
    
i answered as if it's a bad case and shouldn't happen –  VB9-UANIC Jan 29 '13 at 13:51
    
FWIW -- I think that algorithm description could use a little help here, but it's definitely not a bad question. The problem is described and code is provided which makes a good attempt at solving the problem. The biggest place that people have to complain about this one is that it is possibly better suited for codereview.stackexchange since OP claims the code already works. Anyway, +1 on the question from me ... –  mgilson Jan 29 '13 at 14:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think this should do it:

import itertools
import collections

q1 = 'q1'
q2 = 'q2'
q3 = 'q3'

dic_list = {
     q1:[1,2,3,4,5],
     q2:[2,3,5],
     q3:[2,5]
     }

#sets are much more efficient for this sort of thing.  Create a dict
#of the same structure as the old one, only with `set` as values 
#instead of `list`
dic_set = {k:set(v) for k,v in dic_list.items()}

new_dic = collections.defaultdict(dict)
for k1,k2 in itertools.combinations(dic_set,2):
     #to get the count, we just need to know the size of the intersection
     #of the 2 sets.
     value = len(dic_set[k1] & dic_set[k2]) 
     new_dic[k1][k2] = value
     new_dic[k2][k1] = value

print (new_dic)

If you're following the comments, it turns out that combinations is slightly faster than permutations:

import itertools
import collections

q1 = 'q1'
q2 = 'q2'
q3 = 'q3'


dic_list = {
     q1:[1,2,3,4,5],
     q2:[2,3,5],
     q3:[2,5]
     }

dic_set = {k:set(v) for k,v in dic_list.items()}

def combo_solution():
     new_dic = collections.defaultdict(dict)
     for k1,k2 in itertools.combinations(dic_set,2):
          value = len(dic_set[k1] & dic_set[k2])
          new_dic[k1][k2] = value
          new_dic[k1][k2] = value
     return new_dic

def perm_solution():
     new_dic = collections.defaultdict(dict)
     for k1, k2 in itertools.permutations(dic_set,2):
          new_dic[k1][k2] = len(dic_set[k1] & dic_set[k2])
     return new_dic

import timeit
print timeit.timeit('combo_solution()','from __main__ import combo_solution',number=100000)
print timeit.timeit('perm_solution()','from __main__ import perm_solution',number=100000)

with the results:

0.58366894722    #combinations
0.832300901413   #permutations

This is because set.intersection is an O(min(N,M)) operation -- Which is cheap, but can add up if you're doing it twice as many times as you need to.

share|improve this answer
    
+1: Another way of looking into this problem, instead of using permutation. I think both the solution is equally efficient, but that needs to be timed. –  Abhijit Jan 29 '13 at 13:54
    
yeah, +1 for equally neat solution. –  isedev Jan 29 '13 at 13:56
    
@Abhijit -- I think my answer will be faster as it calculates half as many intersections -- Calculating the intersection for sets is an order N operation, so it's not something that you can consider to be completely free. Of course, there's also the question of whether combinations is less efficient than `permutations for some reason, but I doubt it. Anyway, I'll benchmark and post the results. –  mgilson Jan 29 '13 at 13:58
    
@Abhijit -- timings posted. Feel free to point out anywhere that I might have done it incorrectly. –  mgilson Jan 29 '13 at 14:13
    
@mgilson: You win :-) –  Abhijit Jan 29 '13 at 14:19
from collections import defaultdict
#Create a default dict. You don;t have to handle KeyError condition
result = defaultdict(dict)
list_dic= {
    'q1':[1,2,3,4,5],
    'q2':[2,3,5],
    'q3':[2,5],
    }
#Convert the value list to set list
set_dict = {k:set(v) for k,v in list_dic.items()}
# For both way mapping, you need permutation i.e. (q1, q2) and (q2, q1)
for k1, k2 in permutations(set_dict.keys(),2):
    # Now `&` is Set Intersection. The Len will return the length of the common elements
    result[k1][k2] = len(set_dict[k1] & set_dict[k2])


result
defaultdict(<type 'dict'>, {'q1': {'q3': 2, 'q2': 3}, 'q3': {'q1': 2, 'q2': 2}, 'q2': {'q1': 3, 'q3': 2}})
share|improve this answer
    
@mgilson: I was updating my solution before you commented. Yes combination is more efficient but per OPs question, I think permutation is what we would need here –  Abhijit Jan 29 '13 at 13:52
1  
you can simplify "for k1,k2 in list(permutations(list_dic.keys(),2)):" to "for k1,k2 in permutations(list_dic,2):"... easier to read. –  isedev Jan 29 '13 at 13:53
    
@isedev: Its a reminiscent of my debugged version :-) –  Abhijit Jan 29 '13 at 13:55
    
anyway, +1... neat solution. –  isedev Jan 29 '13 at 13:56

if you don't bother if lists can contain duplicate numbers, you can do it with the set() type

>>> s1 = set([1,2,3,4,5])
>>> s2 = set([3,4,5,6,7,8])
>>> s1 & s2
{3, 4, 5}
share|improve this answer

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