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I'm trying to read a file from disk, and output its hex rappresentation.

The code I used is:

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
using namespace std;

int main() {
        ifstream file ("mestxt", ios::binary);
        if (file.is_open())
        {
                char* buffer;
                buffer= new char[0];
                cout<< "File open"<<endl;
                int count=0;
                while (file.good())
                {
                        file.read(buffer, 1);
                        cout<<hex<<int(*buffer)<<" ";
                        count++;
                        if (count%16==0) cout<<endl;
                }
                file.close();
        }
}

It works, but it just... horrifies me, I can't help but think that there MUST exist some functions that do what I've done, just better.

Input:

bn0y5328w9gprjvn87350pryjgfpxl

Output:

File open

62 6e 30 79 35 33 32 38 77 39 67 70 72 6a 76 6e

38 37 33 35 30 70 72 79 6a 67 66 70 78 6c 6c

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by H2CO3, dasblinkenlight, BЈовић, Julius, hjpotter92 Jan 30 '13 at 23:15

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

10  
buffer= new char[0]; looks very-very wrong. –  user529758 Jan 29 '13 at 14:51
3  
Aside from allocating a zero sized buffer [that probably doesn't need to be allocated at all, since all you need is one char], I don't see what you are moaning about. Sure, there are some stylistic/reliability changes [.e.g. not printing the last character twice when you read one past the end], but this is pretty much how I would do this. –  Mats Petersson Jan 29 '13 at 14:54
    
Instead of char* buffer = new char[0] (which is wrong) use char buffer;, file.read(&buffer, 1); and cout << hex << int(buffer) << " "; No need to allocate memory on the heap for one character. –  bikeshedder Jan 29 '13 at 14:57
    
What I mean is, I'm 75% sure that I'm misusing the <ios> libraries, I thought that there could be some methods I could use, but I tried to read the documentations withouth success. –  user1722791 Jan 29 '13 at 14:57
    
Your program works, so the question should be migrated to the codereview site. I flagged for moderator's attention, if moderators agree, the migration should happen soon. –  dasblinkenlight Jan 29 '13 at 14:59
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3 Answers 3

There is a simple way of doing this. Just let STL take care of setting up a loop. If you only care about outputting the hex codes, here is the simplest version:

#include <iterator>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    ifstream is("content", ios::binary);
    cout << hex;
    copy(
       istream_iterator<char>(is), 
       istream_iterator<char>(), 
       ostream_iterator<int>(cout, " ")
       );
}

If you also want to count the number of characters and do the formatting, you should change it into the following:

#include <iterator>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    int cnt = 0; // Will hold the number of characters
    ifstream is("content", ios::binary);
    cout << hex;
    transform(
        istream_iterator<char>(is),
        istream_iterator<char>(),
        ostream_iterator<int>(cout, " "), [&cnt] (char c) -> int {
            if (cnt % 16 == 0) cout << endl;
            cnt++; 
            return c; 
            }
        );
}

The above is using a lambda function, so it requires C++11. However, you can easily achieve the same with a custom-defined functor in C++98.

share|improve this answer
    
This would be the use of already existing libraries I've been searching for. I'd still have the problem of the use of <ios> libraries to get the correct number of character from the input file though, and I'd still have problems here. –  user1722791 Jan 29 '13 at 15:13
1  
+1 Very nice use of the Standard Library to the max! –  dasblinkenlight Jan 29 '13 at 15:15
    
@user1722791: You can easily change the above to count the number of characters. Let me do that. –  Andy Prowl Jan 29 '13 at 15:15
    
@user1722791: There you go. –  Andy Prowl Jan 29 '13 at 15:20
    
@dasblinkenlight: Thank you :-) –  Andy Prowl Jan 29 '13 at 15:21
show 10 more comments

Apart from an easy to fix undefined behavior (allocation of char[0] instead of char[1], followed by writing into buffer[0] - one byte past the allocated space), your program is OK. You can use a scalar in place of a single-element array.

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
using namespace std;

int main() {
    ifstream file ("mestxt", ios::binary);
    if (file.is_open())
    {
        char buffer;
        cout<< "File open"<<endl;
        int count=0;
        while (file.good())
        {
            file.read(&buffer, 1);
            cout<<hex<<int(buffer)<<" ";
            if ((++count)%16==0) cout<<endl;
        }
        file.close();
    }
}

You can make your program a lot more efficient by reading more than one character at a time, but on inputs of small size it does not matter at all.

share|improve this answer
    
I can't read a line at a time because I can't suppose that the input files has lines at all; I could read 16 bytes instead of 1, but I'd have problems of repetitions if !file.good() –  user1722791 Jan 29 '13 at 15:01
    
@user1722791 You're right, this is binary. Still you can provide larger buffers, and get multiple characters in a single call to file.read. There would be a nested loop, though. –  dasblinkenlight Jan 29 '13 at 15:03
1  
If you move "file.read()" into the while [removing file.good()], you won't get the repeated last char (6c twice in the output listed above, where there is only one 'l' in the file itself). –  Mats Petersson Jan 29 '13 at 15:06
    
@dasblinkenlight I thought so; I could empty the buffer before each file.read and cout to avoid the repetition problem, but I don't think i can trust the EOF flag, since it would be already set on after reading the last 16 bytes. –  user1722791 Jan 29 '13 at 15:07
    
@Mats: Done. Does this makes me sure that file.good() is always true? –  user1722791 Jan 29 '13 at 15:09
show 1 more comment

If you know your file is going to be small enough to fit in memory it is much faster to read the entire file into a buffer and then parse it:

std::ifstream file("mestxt", std::ios_base::binary);
file.seekg(0, std::ios_base::end);
std::vector<char> buffer(file.tellg()); 
file.seekg(0, std::ios_base::beg);
file.read(&buffer.front(), buffer.size());

std::cout << std::hex;
std::copy(buffer.cbegin(), buffer.cend(), std::ostream_iterator<int>(std::cout, " "));
share|improve this answer
    
While it's true for my aim (romhacking, basically), I can't be always sure of that. –  user1722791 Jan 29 '13 at 15:23
    
@user1722791 Even still, you should loop over large chunks (of a size you know will fit in memory) instead of reading a character at a time. You'll get hit for file IO a character at a time in the real world :) –  Dave Jan 29 '13 at 15:37
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