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I'm looking for a way to ignore specific entries in matrices for subsequent linear regression in MATLAB

I have two matricies: y =

    9.3335    7.8105    5.8969    3.5928
    23.1580   19.6043   15.3085    8.2010
    40.1067   35.2643   28.9378   16.6753
    56.4697   51.8224   44.5587   29.3674
    70.7238   66.5842   58.8909   42.7623
    83.0253   78.4561   71.1924   53.8532

and x =

    300   300   300   300
    400   400   400   400
    500   500   500   500
    600   600   600   600
    700   700   700   700
    800   800   800   800

I need to do linear regression on the points where y is between 20 and 80, so I need a way to fully automate the process. I tried making the outlying y values [and their corresponding x values] NaNs, but during linear regression, matlab included the NaNs in the calculations so I got NaN outputs. Can anyone suggest a good way to ignore those entries or to ignore NaNs completely calculations? (NOTE: the columns in y will often have different combinations of values, so I can't eliminate the whole row).

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Will you perform a linear regression on each column separately, or do all the data contribute to a single regression? –  Jonas Jan 29 '13 at 15:28
    
What version of Matlab do you use? Do you have access to the Statistics toolbox? –  Jonas Jan 29 '13 at 15:28
    
Lin. reg. will be done on each column seperately, yes. My goal is to obtain four different pairs of slope/intercept so that I can use loops for later calculations. –  TheMcCleaver Jan 29 '13 at 15:42
    
And my Matlab version is R2011a. No idea what the Stats toolbox is. –  TheMcCleaver Jan 29 '13 at 15:44
    
Thanks Jonas! It works perfectly! Though I'll admit, I don't entirely understand what is going on in the loop and how you got the linear regression values from that (I was using a first-order polyfit for that). Can you elaborate a bit on what is happening there? Thanks. –  TheMcCleaver Jan 29 '13 at 16:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Since you perform your regression on each column separately, you can simply form an index into rows with the valid y-values:

nCols = size(x,2);

results = zeros(2,nCols);
validY = y>20 & y<80; %# a logical array the size of y with valid entries
nValid = sum(validY,1);

for c = 1:nCols
    % results is [slope;intercept] in each column
    results(:,c) = [x(validY(:,c),c),ones(nValid(c),1)]\y(validY(:,c),c);

end
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Thanks Jonas! It works perfectly! Though I'll admit, I don't entirely understand what is going on in the loop and how you got the linear regression values from that (I was using a first-order polyfit for that). Can you elaborate a bit on what is happening there? Thanks. –  TheMcCleaver Jan 29 '13 at 16:19
    
@user2022167: I am solving a system of equations of the form Au=B, where each row of A contains the coefficients of the unknowns, i.e. your x-values, and 1 (for the constant). To get the unknowns u, I "divide" by A, i.e. u=(A^-1)B. This is done by the `\`-operator. –  Jonas Jan 29 '13 at 16:29
    
@user2022167: that's what you go to linear algebra classes for :) –  Jonas Jan 29 '13 at 16:30
    
Q_Q I've forgotten far too much linear algebra than I should have. However, your explanation makes sense now that I'm looking through it. One last thing though, what are the ones? I'm writing out the matrices on paper and I have x = [400 1] \ [23.158], put I can't recall what the 1 represents. –  TheMcCleaver Jan 29 '13 at 16:53
    
@user2022167: u(1)*x+u(2)*1 = y –  Jonas Jan 29 '13 at 19:14

If the NaNs occur in the same locations in both the X and Y matrices, you can use a function call like the following, your_function( X(~isnan(X)), Y(~isnan(X)) ). If the NaNs don't occur in the same locations, you will have to first find the valid indices by something like, `X(~isnan(X)| isnan(Y))'

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