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Trying to push a message into UI and receive some result to return in synchronous way from web-service. Method code goes as follows.

[OperationContract]
public string DecypherCaptcha(string captcha)
{
    var connection = new HubConnection("http://localhost:51806");
    IHubProxy hub = connection.CreateHubProxy("robo");

    string decaptcha = null;
    hub.On("captchaDecyphered", decyphered =>
    {
        decaptcha = decyphered;
    });

    connection.Start().Wait();
    hub.Invoke<string>("DecypherCaptcha", new object[] { captcha });

    return decaptcha;
}

The issue is that method finishes before value is obtained from hub's captchaDecyphered. However the expression { decaptcha = decyphered; } triggers fine from server after method exits.
Adding ManualResetEvent flag and WaitOne() for it doesn't solve the problem freezing the execution and preventing hub.On("captchaDecyphered" from firing. Any ideas how to synchronize this?
UPDATE#1 Small notice. Cannot avoid using the intermediate synchronous WCF web-service acting as SignalR client, because of pretty specific robots sitting behind, which are able to interact with outer world only by calling webservices synchronously. Basically in this scenario when robot faces captcha it calls the web-service passing it via SignalR to UI for manual recognition.
UPDATE#2 Thanks to @Ken's inspiring advice got it working by enclosing the connection establishing and hub method invocation into separate 'Thread' followed by waiting with 'ManualResetEvent':

new Thread(() =>
{
    connection.Start().Wait();
    hub.Invoke<string>("DecypherCaptcha", new object[] { captcha });
}).Start();
sync.WaitOne();

Have previously been trying to start from 'Task' supposing it would run on separate thread implicitly, but with no luck.

share|improve this question
    
You may want to look into the ThreadPool instead of the Thread object. It probably won't make any difference at low volumes, but you can run into scheduling problems if you get a whole bunch of requests coming in at once: they'll run more efficiently on a thread pool limited to ~20 threads / processor than if each request (potentially hundreds or thousands) is running on its own separate thread. You can run out of stack space pretty quickly that way. –  Ken Smith Jan 29 '13 at 18:57

2 Answers 2

You could have the DecypherCaptcha hub method on the SignalR server return the deciphered captcha as a Task<string> instead on invoking captchaDecyphered.

You may want to use a TaskCompletionSource to help you create the appropriate task. Basically you could call tcs.SetResult(deciphered) and return tcs.Task instead of calling Clients.Caller.captchaDecyphered(deciphered).

Then your client-side code code would simply be:

[OperationContract]
public string DecypherCaptcha(string captcha)
{
    var connection = new HubConnection("http://localhost:51806");
    IHubProxy hub = connection.CreateHubProxy("robo");

    connection.Start().Wait();
    return hub.Invoke<string>("DecypherCaptcha", captcha).Result;
}
share|improve this answer

You've got several options.

(1) Spin off the request to the SignalR hub onto a separate thread, probably using the static ThreadPool class, and then add in all the ManualResetEvent stuff. That way it won't block when you're waiting on the SignalR method to return.

(2) Make the DecypherCaptcha method asynchronous. It looks to me like the DecypherCaptcha() is intended to be a WCF method that in turn wraps a SignalR method. If that's the case, forgetting for a moment whether this is a wise approach, you could still call a WCF method on the client when the captchaDecyphered SignalR method completes. But if it's not intended to be a WCF method, then you could have DecypherCaptcha() either (a) return a Task<T>, and only flag the Task to be complete when the captchaDecyphered completes; or (b) pass in a Func<T> as a continuation parameter, and call that when the captchaDecyphered completes.

In general, one of the things that makes asynchronous programming difficult is that except for the very top-level method, you generally need to make every method that calls an asynchronous method itself asynchronous, all the way up and down the stack, either through the Async pattern (nasty), or continuation passing (better) or through a Task object + async/await (probably best). So adding in a single asynchronous method often results in significant changes to your application, all the way through. That's one of the many reasons why the new async and await keywords in .NET 4.5 are so helpful, because they help to encapsulate the necessary changes when you start making your application asynchronous.

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Thanks for you comments! I've added some explanation why cannot go with option 2. –  SZved Jan 29 '13 at 17:49

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