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I'm trying to import the NDC database that you can download here: http://www.fda.gov/drugs/informationondrugs/ucm142438.htm

When I initially tried to import the excel in the zip file it complained about the format, so I started with a blank excel, and imported it into excel from the txt file.

I've created a table to import the data into and set all the columns to nvarchar(MAX). The column it complains about is the SUBSTANCENAME column. I checked, and the longest value in that column is about 2700 characters.

My understanding is that the nvarchar(MAX) should easily hold that much. I'm not sure what to do about this other than changing that column to a text field. Should that fit into that column how it is?

I've tried setting it to ignore errors, but as far as I can tell that does nothing, at least it never seems to ignore them when I try.

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

How are you importing the data into the SQL Server table? If I remember correctly, SSIS uses the first 5 or 10 rows of the Excel file to determine the datatype and length. I remember I had to make a change to the registry in order to get a larger sample size HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Wow6432Node\Microsoft\Jet\4.0\Engines\Excel The TypeGuessRows entry can be modified to get a larger sample size. That is assuming you are using SSIS - but if you are using SQL Server Import then it would be doing the same thing as well.

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Does that mean it's not really running into an issue with the table, but the data SSIS is expecting? – Jhorra Jan 29 '13 at 19:56
    
Yes exactly. If you are using SSIS for the import, by default it queries the first 8 rows from Excel to make a judgement call on the datatype and length. If any of the rows coming in after the first 8 are larger then it will complain of truncation because it wasn't expecting it. If you modify your registry value to a larger number it should get past the problem. Or you could import it in another format such as CSV where you have greater control over the datatypes and lengths. NVARCHAR(MAX) won't run out of space - it can have a lot of overhead though. – Simon Worth Jan 29 '13 at 20:09
    
Ok, I knew about the registry fix, but I didn't realize why you did it. I thought since my table column was big enough to hold it that was enough. Lesson learned. – Jhorra Jan 29 '13 at 20:11
    
Agreed, it's confusing behavior for sure. I wish MS would go ahead and change that default value to something larger but I guess it probably doesn't pop up much for them. Hope that helps! – Simon Worth Jan 29 '13 at 20:22

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