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Something peculiar happened when I was overloading operator+

I have a singly-linked list, and I overloaded the operator+ and operator=

Here's my implementation for both (edit: with insertFront and copy constructor):

 AnyList::AnyList(const AnyList& list)
{
count = list.getCount();
first = list.getFirst();
AnyList a;
a.setFirst(first);
a.setCount(count);

Node *current = first;
for (int i = 0; i < count; ++i)
{
    a.insertFront(current->getData());
    current = current ->getLink();
}
}

-

      void AnyList::insertFront(int value)
{
Node *newNode = new Node;
newNode -> setData(value);
newNode -> setLink(first);
first = newNode;
++count;
}

AnyList AnyList::operator+ (const AnyList& list) const
{

Node *current = first;
Node *listCurrent = list.getFirst();

int sumHolder = 0;
AnyList temp;
while(current != NULL)
{
    sumHolder = current ->getData() + listCurrent ->getData();
    temp.insertFront(sumHolder);
    current = current ->getLink();
    listCurrent = listCurrent ->getLink();
}

return temp;
}


AnyList& AnyList::operator=(const AnyList& rightSide)
{

if(&rightSide != this)
{
    Node *travel = rightSide.getFirst();

    first = rightSide.getFirst();

    Node *original = first;

    while (travel != NULL)
    {
        original ->setData(travel ->getData());
        original ->setLink(travel ->getLink());
        travel = travel->getLink();
        original = original ->getLink();
    }
}

return *this;
}

Here is what is in main:

AnyList mylist;
AnyList mylist2;

for (int i = 0; i < 10; ++i)
{
    mylist.insertFront(i);
}
for (int i = 10; i < 20; ++i)
{
    mylist2.insertFront(i);
}

mylist.print();
cout << endl << endl;
mylist2.print();
cout << endl;
AnyList sumList = mylist + mylist2;
sumList.print();
cout << endl;

My output is as follows (which is the output I desired):

    9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 

19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10

10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 

So, my question is, when I instead write:

    AnyList sumList;
sumList = mylist + mylist2;
sumList.print();

I get a bad-access error when it goes into the print function and attempts to return the data from the function getData()

I'm super unaware of why this is the case, any help would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks!

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show at least insertFront(). Do you have a copy constructor??? –  UmNyobe Jan 29 '13 at 17:04
    
Not that the first case doesn't even use operator= - it uses the copy constructor. –  Joseph Mansfield Jan 29 '13 at 17:09
    
Or move constructor, I should say. –  Joseph Mansfield Jan 29 '13 at 17:26
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4 Answers

mylist + mylist2 creates a temporary, whose destructor is called at the end of the full expression. Your assignment operator does a shallow copy, so if the memory is freed by the temporary's destructor being called, sumList will now have dangling pointers.

Read up on how to do deep copies.

To test this, you can temporarily remove the destructor. Just to test though - you'll need it if you're managing resources.

share|improve this answer
    
Ah, that helps SO much! Thanks :D –  Nolan Anderson Jan 29 '13 at 17:09
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This code

AnyList sumList = mylist + mylist2;

calls a copy constructor rather than operator= (see copy initialization)

And this

sumList = mylist + mylist2;

Indeed calls operator=

Most probably your copy constructor performs a deep copy, which is correct and doesn't lead to a crash. Your operator= does shallow copy and you get a crash as a result

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Why do you get an error in one case and not the other? Because AnyList sumList = mylist + mylist2; does not call the = operator but instead invokes the copy constructor. Whereas

AnyList sumList;
sumList = mylist + mylist2;

calls the default constructor and then invokes the = operator.

You haven't shown us enough of your code to be sure why it is crashing when you use the operator= but I'd suggest that Luchian Grigore's answer probably has the right of it.

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Your assignment operator copies the "first" pointer from the other list, so that both lists end up sharing the same nodes. (The loop in the operator is just a long-winded way of doing nothing, since you're assigning each node's data an pointer to themselves). Presumably, the list has a destructor which deletes its nodes, so you will end up with both lists trying to delete the same nodes; hence the error (or some other undefined behaviour).

If you want the list to be copyable and assignable at all, which is perhaps not a good idea, then you will have to do a "deep" copy, creating new nodes for the assigned-to list. Also, remember to delete the old nodes before reassigning your pointers to them.

Better still, unless you're learning how to implement a linked list, use the containers provided by the standard library.

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