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Below is the code

$string = "any text
Affected area :
menu

Feature to test :

diagnostics
";

$string1=rindex($string,':');
print "$string1\n";

$string2=substr($string,$string1+1);
print "$string2";

I can able to find the string after "Feature to test" using above code but i want to find the string which is for Affected area eg. menu.Please help

share|improve this question
    
use Perl's debugger as perl -d your_script.pl and apply break-point in your code, this way you can figure out what is mssing in you regexp. – Krishnachandra Sharma Jan 29 '13 at 18:46

I take that this is a test program of some sort. Would doing this this way make more sense?

use strict;
use warnings;

my $feature_to_test;
my $affected_area;
while ( my $line <DATA> ) {
    chomp $line;
    if ( $line =~ /^Affected area\s*:/i ) {
        for (;;) {  #Loop forever (until I tell you to stop i.e.)
            my $line = <DATA>;
            if ( $line !~ /^\s*$/ ) {
               $affected_area = $line;
               last;
            }
        }
    }
    if ( $line =~ /^Affected area\s*:/i ) {
        for (;;) {  #Loop forever (until I tell you to stop i.e.)
            my $line = <DATA>;
            if ( $line !~ /^\s*$/ ) {
               $affected_area = $line;
               last;
            }
        }
    }
    if ( $line =~ /^Feature to test\s*:/i ) {
        for (;;) {  #Loop forever (until I tell you to stop i.e.)
            my $line = <DATA>;
            if ( $line !~ /^\s*$/ ) {
               $feature_to_test = $line;
               last;
            }
        }
    }

}
else {
    print qq("Not a special line: "$line"\n);
}

__DATA__
any text
Affected area :
menu

Feature to test :

diagnostics

The advantage of this method is that it allows you to test line-by-line instead of trying to parse the entire record at once. Plus, it better emulates the way a file would be read in.

It's also possible to use split to split your long text into an array that you could also go through line by line too:

use strict;
use warnings;

my $string = "any text
Affected area :
menu

Feature to test :

diagnostics
";
my @string_list = split /\n/, $string;  #Now, this is split line by line
for my $line ( @string_list ) {
    print "same logic as above...\n";
}

Doing this as a loop and reading in each line makes the logic a bit cleaner and easier to understand. It's probably not as efficient, but even reading in a multi-million line file in Perl doesn't take more than a few seconds even on an econo-box PC.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your quick reply.It solved my problem – user1891916 Jan 29 '13 at 19:04
    
@user1891916 - Would you so kindly mark this as an answer? – David W. Jan 29 '13 at 20:06

Perhaps a regex using a positive lookbehind and a capture will be helpful here:

use strict;
use warnings;

my $string = "any text
Affected area :
menu

Feature to test :

diagnostics
";

my ($area) = $string =~ /(?<=area :\n)(.+)/;

print $area;

Output:

menu
share|improve this answer
    
I am using the same command to get the string after Feature to test : eg diagnostics like my ($test) = $string =~ /(?<=test :\n)(.+)/; i am getting Use of uninitialized value $test1 in print. Why? – user1891916 Jan 29 '13 at 18:43
    
@user1891916 - There are two newlines after test :, so try /(?<=test :\n\n)(.+)/. – Kenosis Jan 29 '13 at 19:12

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